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LIBRARY OF THE 

John G. Johnson Collection 

CITY OF PHILADELPHIA 






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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
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http://archive.org/details/illustratedcatal00amer_15 



ON VIEW ON THE PREMISES 

No. 38 EAST FIFTY-SECOND STREET, NEW YORK 

APRIL 1 st, 2nd and 3rd, 1913, FROM 1 a. m. UNTIL 4 p.m. 

ADMISSION EXCLUSIVELY BY CARD. WHICH MAY BE HAD 

ONLY ON WRITTEN APPLICATION TO 

THE MANAGERS 



THE RITA LYDIG COLLECTION 

OF 

NOTABLE ART TREASURES OF THE 

GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE 

PERIODS 



TO BE SOLD AT UNRESTRICTED PUBLIC SALE 

BEGINNING ON 

THE AFTERNOON OF FRIDAY, APRIL 4th 

AT 2.30 O'CLOCK 

AT THE AMERICAN ART GALLERIES 

MADISON SQUARE SOUTH 
AND CONCLUDING ON 

FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 4th 

AT 8.45 O'CLOCK 

IN THE GRAND BALLROOM OF THE PLAZA 

FIFTH AVENUE, 58th TO 59th STREETS 



WHEN PROSPECTIVE BUYERS WILL BE ADMITTED BY CARD 

WHICH WILL BE LIMITED TO THE CAPACITY OF THE SALESROOM AND 

MAY BE HAD ONLY UPON WRITTEN APPLICATION 

TO THE MANAGERS 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



OF THE 



RITA LYDIG COLLECTION 



REPRINTED FROM THE CATALOGUE PREPARED BY 

WlLHELM R. VALENTINER 

with the assistance of 
Durr Friedley 

for private circulation 

TO BE SOLD AT UNRESTRICTED PUBLIC SALE 

ON THE DATE HEREIN STATED 



THE SALE WILL BE CONDUCTED BY 

MR. THOMAS E. KIRBY, OF 
THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, MANAGERS 

6 EAST TWENTY-THIRD STREET 

MADISON SQUARE SOUTH 

NEW YORK 

1913 



CATALOGUE Prepared and Published by 
THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION 

Introduction and Descriptions by 

Dr. Wilhelm R. Valentines, and Dimit Fkiedeev 

of the Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Printing and Binding by The Lent & Graff Company 

Illustrations by the Walker Engraving Company 



CONDITIONS OF SALE 

1. The highest bidder to be the Buyer, and if any dispute arises 
between two or more Bidders, the Lot so in dispute shall be immediately 
put up again and re-sold. 

2. The Auctioneer reserves the right to reject any bid which is 
merely a nominal or fractional advance, and therefore, in his judgment, 
likely to affect the Sale injuriously. 

.'3. The Purchasers to give their names and addresses, and to pay 
down a cash deposit, or the whole of the Purchase-money, if required, 
in default of which the Lot or Lots so purchased to be immediately put 
up again and re-sold. 

4>. 'The Lots to be taken (.way at the Buyer's Expense and Bisk 
within twenty-four hours from the conclusion of the Sale, unless other- 
wise specified by the Auctioneer or Managers previous to or at the time 
of Sale, and the remainder of the Purchase-money to be absolutely paid, 
or otherwise settled for to the satisfaction of the Auctioneer, on or 
before delivery; in default of which the undersigned will not hold them- 
selves responsible if the lots be lost, stolen, damaged, or destroyed, but 
they will be left at the sole risk of the purchaser. 

5. While the undersigned will not hold themselves responsible for 
the correctness of the description, genuineness, or authenticity of, or 
any fault or defect in, any Lot, and make no Warranty whatever, they 
will, upon receiving previous to date of Sale trustworthy expert opinion 
in writing that any Painting or other Work of Art is not what it is rep- 
resented to be, use every effort on their part to furnish proof to the 
contrary; failing in which, the object or objects in question will be sold 
subject to the declaration of the aforesaid expert, he being liable to the 
Owner or Owners thereof for damage or injury occasioned thereby. 

6. To prevent inaccuracy in delivery and inconvenience in the 
settlement of the Purchases, no Lot can, on any account, be removed 
during the Sale. 

7. Upon failure to comply with the above conditions, the money 
deposited in part payment shall be forfeited; all Lots uncleared -within 
one day from conclusion of Sale (unless other-wise specified as above) 
shall be re-sold by public or private sale, without further notice, and the 
deficiency (if any) attending such re-sale sliall be made good by the de- 
faulter at this Sale, together with all charges attending the same. This 
Condition is -without prejudice to the right of the Auctioneer to enforce 
the contract made at this Sale, without such re-sale, if he thinks fit. 

8. The Undersigned are in no manner connected with the busi- 
ness of the cartage or packing and shipping of purchases, and although 
they will afford to purchasers every facility for employing careful 
carriers and packers, they will not hold themselves responsible for the 
acts and charges of the parties engaged for such services. 

The AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, Managers. 
THOMAS E. KIRBY, Aictioneer. 



INTRODUCTION 

(Reprinted from Mrs. Lydig's privately issued Catalogue) 

Mrs. Lydig's house is one of the Last creations of Stanford 
White, and is especially successful in the simple and dignified 
proportions of the rooms, which simulate cleverly the impressive 
halls and loggias of Italian Renaissance palaces. Stanford 
White's work was almost exclusively confined to the archi- 
tectural part; the furnishings have heen slowly selected piece 
after piece with much painstaking care and a sense for the 
appropriate and the highly decorative. In this way. to the 
excellent skeleton of the rooms have been added furnishings 
which consist almost exclusively of unusually fine original 
objects of the period, and constitute, together with the archi- 
tecture, a remarkable example of Renaissance decoration. 

A glance over the general arrangement of Mrs. Lydig's 
house shows a collection of works of the most diverse materials, 
chosen from almost all the countries in which the Renaissance 
held triumphal sway, although the Italian note is the domi- 
nating one. One wonders at the diversity of these objects which 
stand here amicably side by side and lend variety to a still 
harmonious whole. Two Tintorettos hang not far from two 
portraits by Moro; French Gothic saints face Delia Robbia 
medallions in the same room, which is further adorned by a 
fine Flemish tapestry woven with gold and silver thread; a 
German or French wood-carving stands beside an Italian 
bronze; Chinese and Persian vases ornament the chimney 
pieces; Italian Renaissance tables consort in a corner with Eng- 
lish chairs of the Elizabethan period and richly carved Portu- 
guese chairs of a later date. On the floors are Ispahan rugs of 
admirable quality, dating from the seventeenth century — rugs 
resembling those we find in Van Dyck's Genoese pictures as 
characteristic details of Italian interiors of the late Renaissance. 



Adherence to style, which demands that every object in a room 
or house be of one and the same period and origin, has not 
been made of the first importance here, and the more for- 
tunately, too, for such so-called perfect arrangements are gen- 
erally cold and monotonous. Here harmony is obtained by the 
predominating Italian note and the uniformly high quality 
of all the objects assembled, while variety is achieved by 
mingling with the Italian objects examples of the art of 
other nations not inimical to that of the Italian Renaissance. 
For really choice objects, selected with taste, will blend har- 
moniously, no matter how diverse their period or origin. 

PAINTINGS 

Proper appreciation of the fact that a house must not mas- 
querade as a museum demands the subordination of pictures 
to purely decorative purposes — to relieve flat surfaces and to 
lend variety to the assemblage of sculptured objects. All told, 
there are not more than a dozen paintings in Mrs. Lydig's col- 
lection — all pictures of strongly decorative character, as, for 
instance, the portrait by Coello, and the early Italian pictures, 
each of which is none the less of individual artistic merit. 

The Botticelli Venus is the most remarkable of the early 
Italian paintings. The statuesque figure stands out against 
a black background, and its charming and finished contours, 
its largely planned lines, the delightful play of the scarf which 
ripples downward like narrow lines of water to divide on the 
earth, its fantastic, yet realistic conception — these combined 
qualities are all characteristic of the genius of the great Floren- 
tine. 

In contrast to the severity of Botticelli's style, the three 
Sienese Madonnas seem full of that intimate sweetness and lyric 
feeling which distinguished the Sienese art of the period. Here, 
too, the conception is simple and pre-eminently decorative, 
relying chiefly for its effect, however, on small ornamental 
details in which bright colors and gold ornamentation play a 
prominent role. Compared to the fifteenth century Floren- 
tines, the Sienese of the period were conservative to a degree, 



and were still to a great extent dominated by the Byzantine 
ideas of the Trecento, notably in their almost invariable use 
of a gold background. Their most remarkable works are por- 
trayals of the Madonna. 

The oldest of the three pictures, the Madonna Enthroned, 
by Sano di Pietro, still displays much of the splendid churchly 
style of the Majestas pictures of the Trecento, but certain 
details — the shy expression of the Child, and the cherub heads 
with their bright wings — point to the more human feeling 
of a later period. Matteo di Giovanni's Madonna with Two 
Saints is already more realistic, more genre-like in conception, 
and evinces a tenderer and more pleasing sentiment, especially 
in the rendering of the female heads. The little picture by 
Xeroccio di Bartolommeo, however, must be rated as one of the 
fairest flowers in Siena's lyric garden. The Madonna type is 
designedly archaic, shielding her mood of melancholy beneath 
a veil of churchly dignity, while the little fair, curly head which 
presses close to her is full of natural and naive feeling. Both 
figures are painted with clear transparent technique, and sur- 
rounded by glowing, golden decorations. 

One cannot conceive of these Sienese paintings without 
their original frames, which in the truly decorative spirit of 
the period were designed simultaneously with the picture. For- 
tunately in the case of Mrs. Lydig's three pictures, these 
original frames have been preserved. 

The two sketches by Tintoretto introduce us to quite 
another world. There is no trace here of the medieval Gothic 
spirit which pervades the foregoing pictures. We are trans- 
ported to the Middle Renaissance — to the beginning of that 
modern period which exalts the personality of the painter. 
Every brush-stroke counts, and expresses the artist's joy in 
achievement, in the rendering of fleeting, picturesque im- 
pressions, and in the gleaming play of light, in a manner 
unknown to the linear art of the Botticelli period. These 
sketches are thrown on to the canvas with astounding sureness, 
and remarkably modern feeling. Seeing them, we no longer 



wonder that Greco, that most modern among the Old Masters 
found in Tintoretto the source of his inspiration. 

Dutch Renaissance art is represented by two masterpieces 
by Antonio Moro, the greatest portrait painter of this period 
in Holland. Measured by the scope of other Northern Renais- 
sance masters, his art had international merits and reached out 
far beyond the narrow confines of the primitives. He studied 
in Italy, where he felt the influence of Titian, lived now in 
Holland, now in Belgium, went with the Spanish court to 
Madrid and Lisbon, spent a short time in London, and finally 
returned to Holland. His work always displays, however, a 
characteristic Dutch earnestness and Northern depth of con- 
ception and capacity for intensive character delineation which 
stamp him as one of Rembrandt's greatest predecessors. 

Characteristically the portrayal of mere feminine beauty 
lay little within the scope of his art, and his women, though 
always distinguished, are hard-featured and of a certain regal 
aloofness. In the two portraits of a man and wife, owned by 
Mrs. Lydig, the tense, penetrating expression of the masculine 
head renders it easily the more striking picture. The face, seen 
half in profile, with eyes looking penetratingly toward the 
spectator, and the wrinkled forehead, all betoken a gloomy, 
troubled nature, of which the gesture towards the skull held in 
his right hand seems peculiarly illustrative. The dark hair, low 
forehead and thick lips suggest a Southerner, possibly a Span- 
iard. The woman's costume, too, would negative any sug- 
gestion of Dutch nationality, while her splendid ornaments 
intimate the pair to have been persons of distinction. The 
painting of her costume, of the fur, the red-brown velvet and 
the light brocade of her underskirt and embroidered sleeves is 
masterly. The firm, somewhat solid technique and the clearly 
defined outlines are reminiscent of the primitive masters, but 
the whole picture is already steeped in a warm brown atmos- 
phere indicative of the coming Rembrandt. Both portraits 
are in the same manner as the portraits of Antoine de Rio and 
his wife, Eleanor Lopez, in the Louvre, to which they are no 
whit inferior, and like them were probably painted in the sixties 



of the sixteenth century. At the time of the publication of 
Ilynians' admirable book (Antonio Moro, son ceuvre et son 
temps, Bruxelles, 1910) these pictures were still undiscovered 
in private hands in England. 

Moro's works were particularly treasured in Spain, and 
his influence on Spanish art was lasting. Alonzo Sanchez 
Coello, his most distinguished pupil, succeeded him as Court 
Painter, and bequeathed his conception — transposed to a Span- 
ish rigidity — to the Velasquez period. The Portrait of a Lady, 
the so-called "Girl in Red," is undoubtedly one of his finest 
works. The large orange and red surfaces of the gold-em- 
broidered costume are highly decorative, and the contrast 
between the pretty, childish face, and the stiff costume in which 
it is almost buried is not without a certain naive charm. 

The long duration in Spanish portraiture of this pose — 
one hand resting on a table, the other hanging loosely beside 
the body — a pose introduced in all likelihood by Moro — is 
proved by the charming portrait by Mazo of the Infanta Mar- 
garita, her attitude being almost identical with that of the 
"Girl in Red." The technique of the two pictures, however, is 
widely different. In the later picture it is far more free, and 
is reminiscent of Velasquez, in whose great art Moro's intensely 
realistic conception of character, and the brilliant, easy tech- 
nique imported by Greco from the Venetian School, combined 
to create something incomparably new. The portrait is 
painted with light, swift brushwork. The hair gleams with 
light reflections, the silken costume shimmers, and the whole 
figure is enveloped in an atmosphere not found in the paintings 
of the earlier masters such as Coello and Moro. In char- 
acterization, moreover, and true, unostentatious delineation of 
the childish figure, it is in no wise inferior to the works of these 
older masters. This picture is so closely related to the art of 
Velasquez that only the critical eye of a great authority on 
Spanish Art, such as Berruete, could distinguish it from the 
master's own portraits of this Princess in the Hofmuseum at 
Vienna and in the Louvre. As far as I know there is no 
replica of this painting, which in point of date comes between 



the two above-mentioned portraits of the Princess, which por- 
tray her respectively at earlier and later stages of her career. 
Our picture is, without a doubt, a product of the Master's 
atelier, and Berruete, as in the case of most paintings closely 
allied to Velasquez' style, ascribes it to his son-in-law, Mazo. 

SCULPTURES 

The charming wood-carving of King Clotaire, which, com- 
bined with another group from an altar-piece still in its 
original environment at Recloses (Seine-et-Marne) , represent- 
ing a scene from the life of St. Eloi, is a late Gothic produc- 
tion from the North of France — that last stronghold of the 
Gothic style — near the boundary of Flanders. Our portion of 
the altar-piece depicts King Clotaire, with a companion, ad- 
miring a golden saddle fashioned by St. Eloi and his assist- 
ant, these last figures being still in place at Recloses. The 
distinguished, sharply cut features of the King and of the man 
standing behind him, the rhythmic play of line in the folds 
of their garments, and the delicate coloring which is well pre- 
served in the faces and on part of the costumes, are all char- 
acteristic of the pleasing conception of a Northern French 
artist who combined beauty of form with the powerful 
Flemish style with which he was imbued. 

While the long-drawn figures and powerful sweeping lines 
of this group still display the Gothic conception, the influence 
of the Southern Renaissance is already visible in the solidly 
built, strongly set-up figures of two Saints carved in limestone. 
These statues are of the School of Michel Colom.be, sculptor 
of the splendid tomb of Francis II at Nantes. They are 
monumental, dignified and harmoniously balanced, the while 
preserving that friendly expressiveness and subtlety of line 
which are characteristic of French sculpture. 

In contrast to this group, the two little boxwood figures 
of Adam and Eve — representative of German Art during the 
transition period from Gothic to Renaissance, seem clumsy 
and ill-proportioned. They have weakly, almost impossible 
limbs, over-large heads and bands, and testify how little at 



home the Northern artists were as yet in the portrayal of the 
nude in sculpture after the self-conscious shyness of the middle 
ages. And yet these little figures have a charm all their own 
and peculiar to the best miniature wood-carvings — a form of 
art in which the German artists of the period took especial de- 
light. Their action is so emphatic; they are so quaintly 
adorned and so expressive of countenance, that in their own 
way we find them as enjoyable as the more finished French 
sculptures. Farly German boxwood figures — ours date from 
about 1.520 — are extremely rare. Very similar statuettes of 
Adam and Eve, justly ascribed to Konrad Meit of Worms, 
are to he found in the Hofmuseum at Vienna, and in Ciotha. 
Meit was the noted Court Sculptor of the Regent of the 
Netherlands, Margarethe of Austria, in Brussels, and his 
marble tomb of Philip Le Bel and Margarethe at Brou, his 
sandstone portrait busts of Margarethe and other notabilities, 
and his little boxwood figures are among the masterpieces of 
German sculpture. Our little statuettes approach the work 
of this master in quality, and are possibly the product of 
his atelier. 

In a house furnished in the manner of the Italian Renais- 
sance, Italian sculpture naturally occupies a most prominent 
place, and among the large sculptured pieces — reliefs in mar- 
ble, terracotta and stucco — Florentine art deservedly occupies 
the front rank. 

The earliest composition in Mrs. Lydig's collection is a 
stucco relief of the Madonna with the Child, whose arms are 
thrown around his mother's neck. It is in the manner of the 
so-called Master of the Pellegrini Chapel, the precursor of 
Florentine early Renaissance (fifteenth century) sculpture, 
whose charming compositions, especially his genre-like repre- 
sentations of religious subjects, greatly influenced his suc- 
cessors, particularly Luca della Robbia. Stucco reliefs, sub- 
sequently colored, in imitation of celebrated marble or terra- 
cotta reliefs from churches, were frequently produced in Italy 
in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries for household decora- 
tion, and these reliefs are the more interesting to us in that 



they oftentimes reproduce lost originals. They are the easts 
of the period and have far more artistic worth than our mod- 
ern plaster easts, in that the coloring, and frequently the 
frame, were original additions made by the copyist. The 
stucco relief of the Madonna and Child in Mrs. Lydig's col- 
lection, after a composition by Luca della Robbia, is an in- 
structive example of this type of work. The original frame 
with Putti, which is in one piece with the relief, enables us to 
date this work about the middle of the sixteenth century — a 
proof of the enduring popularity of stucco reproductions of 
quattrocento originals. 

The three original pieces from the Robbia atelier — the 
Madonna with the Child, from the Lanna Collection; the 
Madonna Adoring the Child, from the Molinier Collection; 
and the Madonna Suckling the Child — are, however, of vastly 
superior artistic merit. Full justice has been done to these 
reliefs by Allan Marquand in his book "Delia Robbias in 
America." These Robbia reliefs bring us to the Golden Age 
of Florentine sculpture, when Donatello's gifted followers, 
Desiderio da Settignano, Antonio Rossellino, Benedetto da 
Majano, and Mino da Fiesole created their ravishing master- 
pieces. Our reliefs, especially that of the Madonna Adoring 
the Child, from the Lanna Collection, and that of the Madonna 
with the Lilies, may be classed with their portrayals of the 
relationship of Mother and Child, which in charm and natural 
feeling are unsurpassed in the history of sculpture. The 
familiar, intimate character of Florentine art during the second 
half of the fifteenth century is exemplified in these Madonnas, 
who are only lovely young Italian women, simple and warm- 
hearted, clasping proudly to their breasts their sturdy, smiling 
children. This distinguishing simplicity lends a special grace 
to the children, and the peculiar charm of childhood, at all 
times so difficult to capture, has in no domain of art been more 
successfully represented. Rut for the distinguishing halo, it 
would hardly occur to us that these are sacred pictures. 

The relief from the Lanna Collection, attributed to An- 
drea della Robbia, has a close resemblance to the work of 



Benedetto da Majano, justly pointed out by Marquand, and 
it is not impossible that a sculptor of the high rank of Bene- 
detto but able to work only in terracotta or marble had sent 
his relief to the Delia Robbia atelier to receive its glaze, for, 
just as in the ease of ceramics, the glaze was sometimes added 
to a terracotta sculpture in a studio other than that in which 
the piece Mas executed. The Madonna Suckling the Child 
bears more resemblance to the style of Antonio Rossellino, and 
is undoubtedly, as suggested by Prof. Marquand, the work of 
the same hand which created the well-known Robbia relief 
from the Ilainauer Collection, now owned by Charles P. Taft, 
Esq. Here in America one is too prone to undervalue glazed 
reliefs which cannot be ascribed with certainty to Luca, An- 
drea or Giovanni della Robbia. This is a mistake. There are 
many examples from the Robbia atelier which cannot au- 
thoritatively be ascribed to any particular one of the three 
Robbias, yet which rank artistically with Andrea's work, and 
are superior to Giovanni's productions. Mrs. Lydig's two 
reliefs mentioned above belong to this category. 

The third relief forms part of a group of sculptures which 
are probably from the hand of Benedetto Buglioni, and are in 
nowise inferior to Giovanni's work. This composition, in itself 
charming, is somewhat clumsily placed in the circular frame, 
but gains decorative value from the well-executed fruit wreath 
which surrounds the figures. 

The only marble relief in Mrs. Lydig's collection is a 
characteristic work by Mino da Fiesole — the last of the great 
Florentine marble sculptors of the Quattrocento — if the well- 
known Ciborium in Santa Maria Maggiore, and the Crucifixion 
in Santa Balbina, both in Rome, are really his work. A com- 
parison of the Adoration on the Ciborium proves without a 
doubt our relief of the Madonna to be from the same hand, 
and this Ciborium and the Crucifixion have heretofore been 
described by Dr. Wilhelm Bode, the foremost expert on Italian 
sculptures, as the chief achievements of Mino's Roman period, 
and published by him as such. It must be mentioned, however, 
that recentlv, on Italian authority, the name of the Roman 



sculptor, Mino del Reame, who is mentioned by Vasari, has 
been connected with these works. This attribution, however, 
has not found many supporters. Our relief, like all Mino's 
Roman work, shows classic influence, in the unusual placing of 
the Madonna in profile, and in the straight, severe lines of 
the drapery. It combines a happy admixture of earnest re- 
ligious feeling in the portrayal of the Madonna, with a fresh, 
naive realism in the delineation of the sleeping Child. 

It is no coincidence that Mrs. Lydig's two free marble 
statues are cinquecento productions, while the works by the 
great quattrocento sculptors are all bas-reliefs. The quattro- 
cento sculptors were pre-eminently masters of relief and even 
in their free sculptures preserved the one-sided aspect, but 
Michelangelo brought about the appreciation of statues des- 
tined to be viewed from different points, and this art was 
further and cleverly developed by his successors. 

The marble statue of the Boy with the Dolphin is closely 
akin to Michelangelo in style, and has many points of similar- 
ity with the Giovannino in Berlin. Its sculptor makes clever 
usage of the contrasted position, so often adopted by Michel- 
angelo (i.e., the forestretching of the right arm and the left 
foot, or vice versa) to obtain the mobile turn of the figure, 
necessary to a sculpture destined to be viewed from several 
different points. This transition of the viewpoint from one 
side to the other has been cleverly carried out, and the easy 
and elegant pose of the figure is entirely characteristic of 
Giovannino. There is much in this work that is reminiscent 
of the signed marble statue by Domenico Poggini, in private 
possession in New York, but here we have to do with an artist 
of higher rank whose conception is on larger and more elegant 
lines. 

While the foregoing work belongs to the early part of the 
sixteenth century, and Michelangelo's first period, Giovanni 
da Bologna's alabaster statue leads us past the middle of the 
century to the days of the great master's later style. The 
Boy with a Dolphin is planned for three different viewpoints, 
although the front view is the best one (a rear aspect is obviated 



by the placing of the figure against a wall), but in his statue of 
Venus Giovanni da Bologna has solved with the utmost vir- 
tuosity that almost insuperable problem for the sculptor, the 
creating of a statue to be viewed from all sides. This work 
belongs to the last phase of Renaissance sculpture, when the 
artists' highly perfected technique tempted them to a some- 
what exaggerated and too complicated pose of the body. 

The bronze statuettes of the Renaissance may be said to 
bear the same relation to the larger sculptures that a drawing- 
bears to the completed work. They are sometimes studies 
reproducing the first inspirations of the great masters; giving 
us often their happiest conceptions which it was scarcely 
possible to carry out on a larger scale; or again, they are works 
of the finest decorative spirit, whose careful execution suggests 
an artist still influenced by the traditions of the goldsmith's 
craft. Almost all the great sculptors — Donatello, Michelan- 
gelo, Giovanni da Bologna, Cellini, and others — have left such 
studies behind them, and side by side with these masters there 
existed a number of others whose talents lay pre-eminently in 
the production of small art objects, and who are less well- 
known than the creators of the large sculptural works. Of 
these may be mentioned the great north Italian bronze sculptor 
Riceio, the Florentines Bellano, Francesco da Sant' Agata, and 
others. On account of their great value, even in the days of 
the Renaissance these bronze statuettes were only to be found 
in princely collections, and even to-day the appreciation and 
knowledge of this branch of art is hampered by the difficulty 
of finding examples to study in public collections. The 
statuettes in Mrs. Lydig's possession afford an excellent oppor- 
tunity of becoming familiar with the work of a number of the 
most notable masters in this distinguished art. 

Andrea Riceio, that great and inspired Paduan artist of 
the fifteenth century, famed for his bronze candelabra in the 
Cathedral at Padua, is represented by two Satyrs playing with 
a ball. These little figures give proof of the much greater 
spontaneity and abandon possible in the execution of statuettes 
as compared to the larger forms of sculpture. Francesco da 



Sunt' Agata is represented by a charming figure, a later cast, 
representing- a youth, reminiscent of the Greek statue of Hyp- 
nos, and prophetic of the Age of Bronze by Rodin. 

The gilded statue of Marysas is another Florentine work 
of the period, and the characteristic, somewhat hard style 
is akin to that of Pollaiuolo and Bellano. The richly decorated 
inkstand, in the form of a casket, is undoubtedly the produc- 
tion of a Paduan pupil of Donatello. These caskets, whose 
rather frequent repetition shows them to have been highly 
prized in the fifteenth century, are generally ascribed to the 
Milan goldsmith Caradosso. 

Among the sixteenth century productions Florentine art 
is especially happily represented. The anatomical figure of a 
man is the work of a pupil of Michelangelo, and is remarkable 
for the knowledge of muscular formation indicated, and for 
the picturesque turn of the figure which we find likewise in the 
large sculptures mentioned above. One must remark the prog- 
ress achieved by the sculptors of this period in their portrayal 
of the nude, and the emphasis they laid on careful chiseling. 

The statuettes in the style of Domenico Poggini, the 
Gladiator, and more especially the- Man carrying a Boy, are 
splendid examples of this trend, the latter one being among the 
finest works of the collection. Poggini is mentioned in Cellini's 
biography as being one of his pupils, and a large number of 
medals executed by him have been preserved. Latterly two 
signed bronze statuettes by him were discovered in the Palazzo 
Vecchio in Florence, and their similarity to our two figures, 
which are duplicated in Mr. J. P. Morgan's Collection, leads 
Dr. Bode to ascribe these works to him. 

Giovanni da Bologna, already mentioned above, was un- 
doubtedly the greatest of Michelangelo's followers in the latter 
half of the sixteenth century and his most remarkable works 
were executed in bronze. His splendid group of Hercules over- 
powering the Arcadian Stag displays his artistry from its best 
side. It has monumental and powerful splendor of line, and 
daring contours, and is pervaded by a sure instinct for beauty 
which is never lost in the complicated pose. 



Bronze statuettes were rarely produced outside of Italy 
during the sixteenth century, and when found, generally be- 
tray a more or less strong Italian influence. The great foreign 
artists Giovanni da Bologna himself was a native of Douai- 
among sculptors in bronze generally transferred the scene of 
their labors to Italy, retaining none the less traces of their 
Northern origin. The light patina and fine lines of the rare 
Equestrian statue of Henry IV of France, which is in all 
probability a Northern production, are characteristic of the 
school of Giovanni da Bologna, and seem to point to his 
authorship. The powerful, expressive group of two nude 
wrestling women, duplicated in the Wallace Collection, is con- 
vineingly ascribed by Dr. Bode to a Flemish artist domiciled 
in Florence. 

The plaee occupied by Padua in the history of fifteenth 
century Italian bronze sculpture is in the sixteenth century 
usurped by Venice; and the best works of this period may be 
ascribed to the two great masters Jacopo Sansovino and Ales- 
sandro Vittoria. Decorative pieces, such as firedogs, ink- 
wells, and candelabra form a large part of their achievement, 
although they also executed large sculptural groups, reliefs 
for church portals and statuettes. These two masters are so 
similar in style that in the case of some of their productions the 
attribution has not been definitely decided at the present time. 

The two charming Putti bearing candelabra are gener- 
ally ascribed to Sansovino. This was the case at the auction 
of the Taylor Collection last year when similar examples were 
sold. Latterly, however, Dr. Bode has attributed these, as 
well as the splendid Venetian firedogs in the Taylor Collection 
and those owned by Mr. J. P. Morgan, to Alessandro Vit- 
toria. However this may be, they are works of the most 
charming decorative value, and the ornamentation of their base 
with sea-horses and dolphins is characteristic of the lagoon- 
encircled city of their birth, as is their exuberant but pleasing 
and picturesque conception. The inkwell, with its ornament 



of cherub heads, belongs to the same category of decorative 
work as the candelabra, although hardly exhibiting an equally 
finished execution of detail. 

GOLDSMITH'S WORK AND CERAMICS 

Some masterly examples of medieval and Renaissance 
goldsmith work represent the achievements of the Northern 
artists of this period, who were superior to the Italian crafts- 
men in their silver and enamels. 

A crucifix, enameled on the front and engraved on the 
back, is one of the rare examples of twelfth century 
Rhenish enamel work which are more individual and bolder 
in design than contemporary French productions, from which 
this piece is further distinguished by its white enamel back- 
ground and its red-brown tones. The Limoges enamel workers, 
between whom and their German confreres a lively rivalry 
existed, are represented by a charming thirteenth century rel- 
iquary, whose design betrays a more lively and elegant taste. 
The glowing blues and green of the enamel, against which the 
engraved and raised figures stand out clearly, are rightly re- 
garded as some of the most inimitable color achievements of 
the Middle Ages. 

A group of six costly drinking vessels, in the form of 
various animals — horses, a lion, a hen — leads us into quite an- 
other world, that of the late German Renaissance with its joy 
in the reproduction of natural objects. The few drinking 
vessels of this kind preserved to us, which are found for the 
most part in public museums, in the collections of the Roth- 
schilds and in private possession in Germany, seem generally 
to have been made at the order of some Prince or of a powerful 
Guild who desired to have their arms reproduced in this form. 
The heads of all these animals, with the exception of one horse, 
can be removed, although even in early times they were prob- 
ably more frequently used for table decoration than as actual 
drinking vessels. 

The small but exceedingly choice collection of ceramics 
leads us to widely differing parts of the globe, from China 



to Persia, from Moorish Spain to Gothic Italy, and we can 

follow thereby a style development extending over a period 
of five hundred years, from the tenth century to the sixteenth. 

The earliest objects are the dark green glazed earthen- 
ware Chinese vases, long attributed to the Han Dynasty (B. C. 
200 — A. I). 220), but now with more justice ascribed to the 
T'ang period (018-900 A.D.). These are vases of large and 
simple lines, admirably reproducing the splendid proportions 
of the bronzes of the Han period from which they were mod- 
eled. These bronzes also determined the ring-like decorations 
in which the original ring handles of the bronzes can be clearly 
distinguished, while the green coloring was doubtless in imita- 
tion of the patina of the bronze vessels. The two other pieces 
of green glazed pottery, a high vase and a low bowl, have 
forms peculiar to ceramics, that of the bowl being frequently 
met with in thirteenth century Persian ware. They belong to 
a later period than the vases already mentioned. The bowl 
with its balanced, careful technique, dates possibly from the 
Sung period (960-1279), while the high vase, whose rough 
handling is reminiscent of the Palace tiles of the Ming dynasty, 
doubtless had its origin in that period. 

Chinese porcelain, which in point of date was subsequent 
to the glazed pottery, is represented by several large fish bowls. 
Like the earthenware vessels, their massive contours and 
simple, severe modeling bear the impress of the medieval spirit. 
They belong to the primitive era of Chinese porcelains, 
the Chia Ching (1.522-1500) and the Wan-li (1573-1019) 
periods, whose products, while less finished, are more robust 
than those of the reign of K'ang-hsi. Their deep ultramarine 
blue, which as yet shows no shading off, has, as a color mass, 
never been surpassed, and it must have been this tone which 
was produced in imitation of the Persian faiences, and which 
received the name of Mohammedan blue. 

At a time when the Chinese still employed an almost 
entirely monochrome ornament in their ceramics, flat decora- 
tions, consisting of figures or motives drawn from vegetation, 
had reached a high point of development in Persia. The two 



faience vases owned by Mrs. Lydig, which were probably 
produced in Mesopotamia in the fourteenth century, show a 
charming decoration of tendrils and arabesques in black on a 
blue-green ground. These vases, while differing in detail from 
the design of the late-period Ispahan rugs which cover the 
floors in this and the adjoining rooms, are still quite in char- 
acter with them, and proclaim themselves the product of a 
land where the linear decoration of flat surfaces reached its 
highest point of development. 

There is no doubt that the Hispano-Moresque artists of 
the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries drew their inspira- 
tion from the lustred faience ware produced in Persia and 
Egypt at an earlier period. Their art, which centered in 
Valencia and a few neighboring towns, is in a certain sense the 
most complete and perfected achievemnt in the whole domain 
of ceramics. It is an art which flowered under certain defi- 
nitely assumed restrictions, necessary to the production of sig- 
nificant and finished forms. This form is limited almost ex- 
clusively to large bowls and albarelli, and the color to a gold 
lustre which in the early period was intermingled with blue, 
while the decorations consist almost exclusively of geometrical 
figures, than which there is no more appropriate ornamenta- 
tion for ceramics. It is only in isolated examples that we find 
that the decorative inspiration has been drawn from nature. 
With these modest mediums, and within a short period of 
time, objects of unsurpassed merit were created. It is true 
that an art in itself so essentially Spanish and restricted could 
not enjoy a long period of life, and its golden age compasses 
hardly one hundred years, from the end of the fourteenth to 
the end of the fifteenth century, and no more than a few hun- 
dred examples of this art have been preserved to us. The 
great mass of lustred faience ware produced after the end 
of the fifteenth century and the expulsion of the Moors up to 
our own days is artistically worthless. 

Mrs. Lydig owns two albarelli and one bowl, specimens of 
the splendid early lustred faience ware which was already 
in the fifteenth century celebrated beyond the confines of Spain 



and highly prized at the courts of the Burgundian and Italian 
Princes. The howl is the most valuable of these three pieces, 
and with one albarello belongs to that early period of the begin- 
ning of the fifteenth century when the purely geometrical 
Moorish style of decoration was still dominant, its Kufic in- 
scriptions, Moorish arches and arabesques being strongly 
reminiscent of the ornamentation of the Alhamhra. The sec- 
ond albarello, of a clear gold lustre, is a little later in date, and 
may be placed about the middle of the century, when small 
Spanish Gothic flower patterns began to mingle with the Ara- 
bian designs. The form of the albarello, or apothecary jar, 
reappears, as is well known, in Italian ceramics, drawn from 
some Spanish source, or from its original home in Mesopotamia. 

Mrs. Lydig's two Italian examples are Florentine and 
Faenza productions of the early sixteenth century, and com- 
pared with the Spanish pieces show how much more diversified 
and highly colored was the Italian conception. The Italian 
craftsmen went even further, and, notably in the sixteenth cen- 
tury, under the influence of the great masters of painting, in- 
troduced figures and scenic representations into their creations 
which were frankly not always adapted to the simple forms of 
ceramic art. These conceptions, however, display so much 
naivete and lively fancy that they are increasingly highly 
prized, despite a growing predilection in favor of the primitive 
ceramic forms. The bowl with the Judgment of Paris is a 
splendid example of the above-mentioned class of work, and 
was in all likelihood produced in the atelier at Urbino during 
the third or fourth decade of the sixteenth century. 

The most notable piece, however, among the specimens of 
Italian faience is a monumental vase with green decorations on 
a gray ground, which constitutes one of the few existing ex- 
amples of Florentine ceramics of the first half of the fifteenth 
century. Its massive contours, direct outlines, the awkward- 
ness yet dignity of the whole conception, remind us that we are 
in the period of Masaccio and Castagno. The ornamentation 
shows an admixture of Gothic and Oriental motives, calling our 
attention to the fact that the beginnings of ceramic art in Italy 



were closely interwoven with the importation of faiences from 
the Near East. This well-preserved work is mentioned by Dr. 
Bode in his hook on early Florentine Majolica as one of the 
chief productions of the early Florentine potters. 

TAPESTRIES, RUGS AND TEXTILES 

The five tapestries of Mrs. Lydig's collection all belong 
to the golden age of that medieval art of weaving, the transi- 
tion period from the Gothic to the Renaissance. While in 
point of time they are restricted to a period of not more than 
forty years, they are splendid examples of the widely differ- 
ing conceptions of the Burgundian and Brussels ateliers. 

The Barharossa tapestry must take precedence in point of 
antiquity, and it is one of the most expressive of the Bur- 
gundian productions which have come down to us. The greater 
number of Burgundian tapestries woven during the reigns of 
Philip the Good and Charles the Bold represent assemblages of 
people or battle scenes filled with figures. Here, however, we 
for once have a single figure conceived in the splendid and 
dignified manner which distinguished all the works of art pro- 
duced at the Burgundian court. The pride and majesty of 
hearing so t3 r pical of the pretensions of the Burgundian rulers 
is expressed in a couple of charming verses at the top of the 
tapestry, quite in the same manner as on the famous tapestries 
representing the history of Trajan in the Museum of Berne, to 
which it hears a strong similarity in style, although it must have 
been executed perhaps twenty years later. It is probably the 
production of the greatest of the Burgundian ateliers, that of 
Pasquale Grenier of Tournai. 

The Burgundians, who were earlier than the Italians in 
their adoption of the Renaissance conception, and whose work 
is invariably characterized by a strong realism, combined with 
the solemnly religious conception of medieval times, were the 
first to introduce genre-like conceptions on a large scale into 
the domain of art. We learn from existing inventories that 
Grenier received orders to weave several tapestries with 



"orangiers" and "gens paysans et bocherons lesquels font 
maniere de ouvres et labourer an (lit hois diverses famous," 
and, in fact, tapestries answering to this description have been 
preserved. The Musee des Arts Decoratifs possesses three of 
these productions, of which two have been rightly identified by 
Dr. A. Warburg with the first of these commissions to Pasquale 
Grenier in 14(>0, and the third with one given to Jean Grenier 
in 1505, and it is of this tapestry that the one in Mrs. Lydig's 
collection would seem to be a part. In our composition the 
page, holding a caparisoned white horse, and accompanied by 
several musicians, is waiting for his master, who in the Paris 
representation is overseeing the labors of the woodcutters. 
These woodcutters are felling orange trees and planting young 
saplings, and their labors earned the name of "orangier" for 
this type of tapestry. The color scheme of gay blue and red 
costumes, with the white horse in the center of the picture, is 
particularly attractive in our example, which is still charac- 
terized by the strong colors of the early Burgundian tapestries, 
although the drawing already betrays the rather more elegant 
conception of the period about 1500. 

The remarkable tapestry with giraffes carrying little 
children on their backs and led by gypsies, is another genre- 
like scene, typifying the love of the Burgundian princes for all 
that was exotic and Oriental. This is one of the oldest presen- 
tations of the giraffe in art. We cannot state authoritatively 
whether we have here a Triumph of the Innocents, as has been 
surmised, or rather one of those curious genre scenes which 
are more akin to the realistic Burgundian temperament. It 
is safe to conclude, however, from the style of the tapestry, 
that it belongs to the first period of Burgundian tapestry 
weaving, prior to the fall of Charles the Bold. 

Although only a short period of time elapsed between the 
production of the above-mentioned work and the one now to be 
described, they are totally different in conception. The Bur- 
gundian style has been displaced by that of the period of Maxi- 
milian, and of the prosperous, powerful trading towns of 
Flanders and Brabant, Bruges, Antwerp and Brussels. This 



new conception, in which the court influence is still dominant, 
is more refined, both in the drawing and in the coloring which 
is dryer and more delicate. Under Italian influence these 
compositions became more harmonious and symmetrical, and 
reached a high point of technical perfection. In rare cases 
gold and silver threads were worked into them. 

Both of Mrs. Lydig's tapestries, the King Jonathan and 
the Xoli me Tangere, stand in close relation to the atelier 
of Jan van Room, who designed the Brussels Herkenbold 
Tapestry, while Mr. J. P. Morgan's famous tapestry, "The 
Kingdom of Heaven," is credited to the same atelier. The love 
of elegant poses and of a multitude of splendid costumes, 
typical of this master, is apparent in the Jonathan tapestry. 
With this is combined a fine feeling for expressive and char- 
acteristic gesture which is of especial importance in the design- 
ing of wall hangings. The colors of the Jonathan tapestry 
correspond to the refinement of its style, and a warm golden 
brown and glowing red appear and reappear throughout the 
composition. 

The gem of the collection is, however, the Noli me Tan- 
gere from the Spitzer Collection. Only rarely did an artist 
of this period, in designing a tapestry, limit himself as in this 
instance to the delineation of a few extraordinarily expressive 
figures. A more successful composition, or one embodying 
more splendid color effects, rarely emanated from the Brussels 
ateliers. The details of the costumes are wonderfully drawn, 
as are the surrounding landscape, the plants in the foreground 
betraying a close study of nature, the trees in the middle dis- 
tance suggestive of an acquaintance with Southern lands, and 
the border a masterwork of light yet luxuriantly intertwined 
foliage. The artists whose united efforts produced this 
work combined in themselves the highest achievement of 
Flemish miniature work, of character portrayal, and of mas- 
terly decorative color combination. 

Six of the Oriental rugs in Mrs. Lydig's collection belong 
to that prized category known to commerce as Ispahan rugs, 
but which, according to later investigation, seem to have had 



their origin in Herat in Eastern Persia. They are charac- 
terized by the incomparable Persian feeling for flat deeora- 
tion, and for the transposition of simple forms of vegetation 
into rhythmically conventionalized motives. Only a few forms 
have been employed, peony blossoms and palmettes predom- 
inating, with bands of cloud, a motive borrowed from the 
Chinese, as connecting links. 

It is no less than wonderful how variegated a picture has 
been created from these slender motives, with their perpetual 
interdevelopment of changing form, which still in nowise de- 
stroys the unity of the whole. Of the three large rugs, that 
with the stiffly arranged palmette design is probably the 
earliest, dating back to the sixteenth century, while the others 
belong to the first half of the seventeenth century. 

The large Indian rug is an especially fine example of the 
weaver's art. These Indian carpets frequently surpass the 
Persian rugs in closeness of weave, although not in artistic 
quality. In our rug, the innumerable small blossoms, the 
stiffly eonventionalized border surrounding them, the harmoni- 
ous coloring, are all characteristic of a late seventeenth cen- 
tury production of the Imperial workshops at Lahore. The 
rug is especially interesting by reason of the innumerable 
Chinese emblems strewn throughout the border. 

A group of textiles composed of exquisite Italian velvets, 
brocades and embroideries of the fifteenth, sixteenth and seven- 
teenth centuries is included in the Lydig collection. The ex- 
tremely rare velvet of the early Renaissance is represented by 
a green cope with the familiar design of pomegranates — a 
design which in its easy and free arrangement ranks as one of 
the most beautiful ever produced. A similar pattern, with 
fuller, more exuberant and unsymmetrically placed tendrils, 
reappears in a Venetian fifteenth century brocaded velvet, of 
which Mrs. Lydig possesses some large strips. A splendid 
result both technically and artistically has been achieved in the 
designing of this deep red velvet lavishly brocaded in gold, 
whose beauty and splendid artistry are typical of its Venetian 
birthplace. The plain red velvet which forms so rich a back- 



ground to the drawing-room is probably a sixteenth century 
production, and is of a similar order to the velvet of the Cope 
embroidered in mid-Renaissance style. 

The embroideries on red velvet which decorate the chairs 
and curtain show, for the most part, the splendid designs of 
the late Renaissance, with representations of figures in circles 
and cartouches, surrounded by arabesques. This style, which 
originated in Italy about 1550, and shows a mingling of the 
influence of Raphael's grotesques with the addition of Oriental 
motives, represents, in a certain sense, the highest development 
of Renaissance embroidery. 

The Spanish ecclesiastical banners adorning the stairway 
lend a curious decorative note. The earliest are contempo- 
raneous with the Italian embroideries mentioned above, being- 
products of the second half of the sixteenth century, and show 
how deep an influence Italian art exercised on Spanish tex- 
tiles. The later specimens date from the latter part of the 
seventeenth century, and indicate the influence of France on 
Spanish embroidery of that period. In both cases the foreign 
type which served as a model has been transposed into some- 
thing over-rich and grandiose, to which, however, a highly 
decorative effect cannot be denied. 

FURNITURE 

The furniture of the Italian Renaissance naturally pre- 
dominates in Mrs. Lydig's collection, although examples of 
contemporaneous Northern work are not lacking. At a period 
when Italy was producing typical Renaissance furniture, such 
as the two Florentine Savonarola chairs, simple Gothic forms 
were still being fashioned on the other side of the Alps. The 
interesting French choir stall, with grotesque figures on the 
arms, belongs to this category of woodwork, and the realism 
of its ornaments is characteristic of the late Gothic spirit. 
There is, it must be admitted, a suggestion of Gothic lines in 
the swinging curves of the heavily built Florentine chairs, 
but their broad contours show how little understanding of 
the Gothic pointed arch there was in Italy. 



Mrs. Lydig's collection is remarkable for the three chests 
—that most characteristic article of Italian Renaissance fur- 
niture — examples which are among the masterpieces of their 
kind. The Venetian chest is the earliest, and is in a splendid 
state of preservation. This type of cassone, ornamented with 
stucco and gilding, which was peculiar to Northern Italy, 
reached its most elaborate development in Venice. The ara- 
besques covering its surface are indicative of the close relations 
which existed between Venetian art and that of the Orient. 

In contrast to this early Renaissance specimen, with its 
relatively flat relief and straight sides, are the three carved 
chests, masterpieces of the Middle Renaissance. This form was 
undoubtedly originated in Florence, but received its later de- 
velopment in Rome, where the great Florentine artists, Raf- 
fael, Michelangelo and others, whose influence Avas strongly 
felt in the decorative arts, had established themselves, and 
where they completed their greatest works. 

Besides the Italian Renaissance furnishings, the collection 
contains isolated examples of Northern Renaissance work. 
There is an English armchair, and three Elizabethan stools, 
which show English furniture of the period to have been 
rough and primitive compared with that of Continental origin. 
Then there are two valuable French cacquetoire chairs, of the 
late sixteenth century, one of which is distinguished by Havard 
as a typical example of its kind. The Portuguese armchairs, 
belonging to the transition period between Baroque and Ro- 
coco, are remarkable examples of a too richly decorated style 
which strove to combine early Moorish ideas with those of 
France and even, perhaps, of Holland. 

WlLHELM It. VALENTINER. 



AFTERNOON SALE 

FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1913 
AT THE AMERICAN ART GALLERIES 

Madison Square South 
beginning promptly at 2.30 o'clock 



CERAMICS 




1— POTTERY BOWL 

Chinese: Ming Dynasty (1368-1043) 

Broad and low, with sides curving inward at the top. 
No foot. Covered with a rich green glaze. 

Height, 0/2 inches; diameter, 10 inches. 

Purchased from Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 



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2— POTTERY VASE 

Chinese: Ming Dynasty (1368-1643) 

Cylindrical in shape, bulging slightly toward the top. 
At the bottom a rather strong molding above the flaring 
base. Two incised lines around the middle of the vase. 
At the top a slight lip. The whole glazed in rich green. 

Height, 121/2 inches. 
Purchased from, Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 




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3— GLAZED POTTERY VASE 

Chinese: T'ang Dynasty (618-907) 

A copy in pottery of a bronze "Tsun" or sacrificial wine 
vase of the Han period. Full body with wide neck, 
decorated with fillets and fine incised geometric patterns. 
Simulated tiger-head and ring handles. Flat glaze, pale 
green in color. 

Height, Hy^ inches. 
Purchased from Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 




37 J 



4— GLAZED POTTERY VASE 

Chinese: T'ang Dynasty (G18-907) 

A copy in pottery of a bronze "Tsnn" or sacrificial wine 
vase of the Han period. Full body with rather broad 
neck, decorated with fillets and simulated tiger-head and 
ring handles. Deep green glaze. 

Height, 141/2 inches. 
Purchased from Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 




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5—PO RCELA IN J A B DIXIE HE 

Chinese: Ming Dynasty, Reign of Wan-li (1573- 
1619) 

Deep bowl, a little smaller at the bottom than at the top, 
with slightly convex sides. Decorated in strong blue 
with two dragons covered with a scale pattern. The back- 
ground rilled with flower and flame motives. At the 
top around the lip a running band of fine ornament. 
Marked on the lip: Ta Ming Wan-li nien chih (Made 
in the reign of Wan-li of the great Ming dynasty). 

Height, 141/2 inches; diameter, 18 inches. 



Purchased from Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 




r^° 



G— PORCELAIN JARDINIERE 

Chinese: Ming Dynasty, Reign of Wan-li (1573- 

1619) 

Deep bowl, a little smaller at the bottom than at the top, 
with slightly convex sides. Decorated in strong bine 
with two dragons covered with a scale pattern. The back- 
ground filled with flower and flame motives. At the 
bottom conventionalized hillocks. Marked on the lip: 
Ta Ming Wan-li nien chih (Made in the reign of Wan-li 
of the great Ming dynasty). 

Height, 141/0 inches; diameter, 18 inches. 



Purchased from Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 




sr* 



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7— PORCELAIN JARDINIERE 

Chinese: Ming Dynasty, Reign of Chia-Ching 
(1522-1566) 

Large shallow bowl, with outcurving slightly convex 
sides. Decorated in deep blue with floral and fish designs. 
Marked on the lip: Ta Ming Chia-Ching nien chih 
(Made in the reign of Chia-Ching of the great Ming 
dynasty) . 

Height, 14 inches; diameter, 28 inches. 

Purchased from Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 




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8— PORCELAIN JARDINIERE 

Chinese: Ming Dynasty, Reign of Chia-Ching 
(1522-1566) 

Large shallow bowl, with outcurving sides, slightly con- 
vex. Decorated in deep blue on white with floral and 
fish designs. Marked: Ta Ming Chia-Ching nien chih 
(Made in the reign of Chia-Ching of the great Ming 
dynasty). 

Height, 14 inches; diameter, 30 inches. 



Purchased from Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 




9— LARGE PORCELAIN JARDINIERE 

Chinese: Ming Dynasty, Reign of Chia-Ching 
(1522-1566) 

Broad, shallow bowl with outcurving convex sides. 
Decorated in deep blue on a white ground with lotus 
and scroll designs. Marked: Ta Ming Chia-Ching nien 
chih (Made in the reign of Chia-Ching of the great 
Ming dynasty). 

Height, 15 inches; diameter, 30 inches. 



Purchased from Mr. Thomas B. Clarke. 









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10— GLAZED POTTERY VASE 

Mesopotamian (XIVth Century) 

Globular body with short neck, covered with bluish- 
green glaze on which the decoration has been painted in 
black. The glaze does not cover the foot. Two hori- 
zontal lines surround the body below the middle of the 
vase, dividing it into two fields which are rilled with thin 
foliated scrolls and leaves. The neck also is decorated 
with scrolls. Partly covered with silvery iridescence. 

Height, 11 inches; diameter, 9 inches. 



Purchased from I). G. Kelekian. 




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11— GLAZED POTTERY VASE 

Mesopotamian (XIVtet Century) 

Geobuear body with slightly higher neck and foot. Blu- 
ish green glaze and black ornaments. The body is divided 
by horizontal lines into three fields, the middle one being 
the widest. In the upper field Cufic inscriptions; in the 
middle one scrolls with arabesques, leaves, and birds; in 
the lowest, fishes swimming to the left. On the neck two 
stripes of geometrical patterns. The foot is unglazed. 
Partly covered with silvery iridescence. 

Height, 11 inches; diameter, 9 inches. 

Purchased frovi D. G. Kelekian. 




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12— LUSTRED FAIENCE DISH WITH MOCK 
ARABIC INSCRIPTIONS 

HlSPANO-MORESQUE : VALENCIA, SPAIN ( ABOUT 1400- 

1430) 

Ornamented in pale blue, dark blue, and gold lustre on 
a cream-colored ground. In the middle a roundel con- 
taining a star pattern; between the roundel and the brim 
four pointed ovals containing spirals alternating with 
bands of mock Arabic inscriptions. The brim is deco- 
rated with undulating curves in light blue. The open 
spaces in the field and in the border are filled with spirals, 
dots and conventional leaves. 

Diameter, 14 inches. 

This dish and the following albarello are of the first period 
of Hispano-Moresque lustred ware, when Arabic elements are 
still predominant in the design, although combined with Gothic 
motives. These pieces can be dated by comparison with similar 
plates in the British Museum and in Earl Spencer's collection, 
which have coat-of-arms dating from before 1430. (Compare 
A. van der Put, "Hispano-Moresque Ware," London, 1909.) 

Purchased from Seligmann <§• Co. 



13—LUSTRED FAIENCE APOTHECARY JAR, 
OR ALBARELLO, WITH MOCK ARABIC 
INSCRIPTIONS 

HlSPANO-MORESQUE : VALENCIA, SPAIN ( ABOUT 14-00- 
1430) 

The design consists of five horizontal bands, the widest 
of which is in the middle. It contains diamond-shaped 
areas filled with forms resembling a fieur-de-lys; the 
upper adjoining band displays a conventional leaf pat- 
tern, the lower adjoining band a design of intersecting 
arches; while the top and bottom bands are made up of 
simulated Cufic inscriptions repeating the initial letter 
of the name of Allah. The neck band also is made up of 
conventionalized Arabic letters. 

Height, 12 inches; diameter, 5 inches. 

Purchased from Scligmann <§- Co. 



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9 <l 



U—LUSTRED FAIENCE APOTHECARY JAR, 
OR ALBARELLO 

Hispano-Moresque: Valencia, Spain (about 1450- 
1475) 

Cylindrical shape, narrowing slightly toward the upper 
part. Low neck and foot, connected with the body by a 
sloping rim. Ornament in pale gold lustre on cream 
color. The decoration consists of five horizontal bands 
containing conventionalized branches, spirals and geo- 
metrical interlacings. Similar patterns on neck and 
shoulder. 

Height, 12 inches. 

Purchased from Seligmunn § Co. 



15— TWO-HANDLED MAJOLICA VASE 



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Italian: Florentine (fiest half of XVth Cen- 
tury) 

Full rounded body with cylindrical neck and twisted 
handles. Reddish clay, the lower third covered with a 
yellow glaze, the upper two-thirds with a white enameled 
ground on which the design is painted in green outlined 
with manganese purple. On each side is an antlered deer, 
holding in its mouth a bunch of decorative oak leaves of 
Gothic form. The background is filled with similar 
foliage. The fore and hind quarters of the deer are 
painted in solid green with purple and white spots, while 
its body is covered with a green and white diaper pat- 
tern which suggests a saddle blanket. The type of animal 
is derived from Near Eastern art. The neck of the vase 
is encircled by a rudimentary guilloche. 

Height, l^i/o inches. 

Reproduced in Dr. Bode's "Die Anfiinge der italienischen 
Maiolika" as in the possession of Stephano Bardini, Florence. 
Also in "Art in America," Vol. I, No. 1. This is one of the few 
large Florentine vases of the Gothic period still extant and in 
perfect preservation. 

Purchased from Seligmann cy Co. 





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16— MAJOLICA APOTHECARY JAR, 

OR ALBARELLO 

Italian: Florentine (late XVth Century) 

Or the usual albarello shape, with incurving sides deco- 
rated on a white ground with pine-cone designs in strong 
blue and orange. Geometrical patterns on shoulder. 



Purchased from the late E. Molinier, Paris. 



Height, 9 inches. 



17— MAJOLICA APOTHECARY JAR, 

OR ALBARELLO 

Italian: Faenza (first half of XVIth Century) 

The usual albarello form, decorated by a broad band 
around the middle divided into two rectangular panels 
containing on an orange ground designs of cornucopia? 
and foliage in blue and white. On one side a coat-of- 
arms. At the top the inscription in Gothic letters, 
"Terra Figilata." 

Diameter, 101/4 inches. 
Purchased from the late E. Molinier, Paris. 






IS— MAJOLICA PLATE 

Italian: Urbino (first half of XVIth Century) 

The Judgment of Paris: Shallow plate with low foot. 
Under a tree at the left sits the naked Paris before whom 
stand the three goddesses each holding a spear. In the 
background hills and mountains with a lake and villages. 
In the foreground a scroll inscribed LA • ISTOHIA 
UE • PARIS E VIENA. Blue-green, yellow and 
black are the predominant colors. On the back a scroll 
pattern on a white ground. In the center beneath the 
foot a large R crossed with a paraph, forming an X, 
possibly the mark of Fra Xanto da Rovigo. (Border 
restored. ) 

Diameter, 10 inches. 
Purchased from Seligmann fy Co. 




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19— MAJOLICA VASE 

Italian: Venetian (about 1600) 

Globular body with short neck decorated on one side 
with a male head in a medallion surrounded by ara- 
besques and acanthus foliage. Colors: orange and blue 
on a cream ground. 



GOLDSMITH'S WORK 



20— RELIQUARY 

French: Limoges (XIIIth Century) 



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(Wood, covered with gilt copper, the outlines engraved, 
the decoration in champleve enamel) 

Small oblong box, the cover in the shape of a gable-roof 
with a cusped ridge carrying three balls at the top. The 
box rests on four square feet. The front is decorated 
with the Crucifixion, above which on the lid is Christ in a 
white medallion with an adoring angel on either side. On 
the back four half-figures of angels in squares of white. 
On both ends angels in circles. In the remaining sections 
conventional floral designs. The heads of the figures are 
raised in high relief. The background is in blue and 
white enamel. 

Length, 6 inches; depth, 2% inches; height, 5 inches. 

Purchased from Seligmnnn Sc Co. 



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21- CRUCIFIX 

German: Rhenish (XIIth Century) 

(Copper, champleve, enameled and gilded) 

On one side the Crucified Christ is represented with arms 
extended. His hands and feet pierced by nails. His body 
is draped from the breast to the knees. The head is in- 
clined to the left; behind it a large cruciform halo. Above 
His head the letters IHS (Jesus) and XPS (Christus). 
On the other side at the intersection of the arms of the 
cross is a circular panel with the Agnus Dei. To the 
left of the head of the Lamb the Greek letter A , to 
the right the letter ft. On the arms foliated ornaments. 
The figure of Christ and the letters above His head exe- 
cuted in champleve enamel. The pattern on the back 
incised. 

Height, 8 inches; width, 5% inches. 

Purchased from Seligmann ($■ Co. 



22— TABLE ORNAMENT IN THE FOR 31 OF A 
HORSE 

German: Augsburg (late XVIth Century) 

(Silver gilt) 

A prancing horse, its fore legs in the air, rests its hind 
legs on an oval base on four scroll feet. Marked with the 
pine-cone of Augsburg and maker's mark H M. 

Height, 9% inches. 

This mark is usually identified with Heinrich Maalich, born 
1625, worked in Augsburg after 1651, died 1698. About twenty 
known works by him, in the Castle, Berlin, in the Treasury, 
Munich, in Moscow, and elsewhere, are recorded in Rosenberg, 
"Der Goldschmiede Markzeichen," Frankfurt, 1911. 

Purchased from A. S. Drey, Munich. 



23— TABLE ORNAMENT IN THE FOR M OF A 
HOUSE 

German: Bkesi.au (late XVI Ith Century) 
(Silver gilt) 

A small, full-bodied horse with short head and flowing 
tail, prances on its hind legs on an oval base, naturalis- 
tically wrought with grass, stumps, and leaves, among 
which are tortoises and insects. The horse is bridled, 
but without reins. A saddle cloth is girded to its back. 
The head of the horse is removable, so that the body may 
be used for a drinking cup. Marked with Breslau stamp 
and C. M. (Christoph Miiller) . 

Height, 8Y2 inches. 

Christoph Miiller was Master of the Guild in Breslau in 
1689 and died in 1735. Five works by him, two dated 1693 and 
1719, are described by Rosenberg. 

Formerly in the Speyer-Cahn Collection. 
Purchased from J. Boehler, Munich. 




24— TABLE ORNAMENT IN THE FORM OF A 
LION 

German: Augsburg (late XVIth Century) 

(Silver gilt) 

A rampant lion, with a long tail, its fore legs in the air, 
its hind legs resting on the ground. Around the neck 
a collar with a fragment of chain attached. Head re- 
movable, so that the object can be used for a drinking 
cup. Marked with the pine-cone of Augsburg and 
maker's mark IZ( ?) . Inscribed on the body J. Z. H. 

Height, 7 inches. 
Purchased from A. S. Drey, Munich. 










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25— TABLE ORNAMENT IX THE FORM OF A 
GOAT J \aA 

German: Augsburg (late XVIth Century) 

(Silver gilt) 

A prancing goat, its fore legs in the air, rests its hind 
legs on an oval base. Head removable, so that the object 
can be used for a drinking sup. Marked with the pine- 
cone and maker's mark E. Z. 

Height, 91/2 inches. 

Many works by this master in the form of lions, owls, deer, 
oxen, etc., are recorded in Rosenberg. One work is dated 1624. 
An ornament in the form of an ostrich signed by him is in the 
Wallace Collection, London, and two salt cellars are in the Cluny. 

Purchased from A. S. Drey, Munich. 



26— TABLE ORNAMENT IN THE FORM OF A 
HEN 



German: Uem (first half of XVIIth Century) 

(Silver gilt) 

A fat hen with carefully chased feathers, standing on an 
oval base. The head is removable so that the object can 
be used as a drinking cup. Ulm mark and maker's mark 
CF. 

Height, 8I/2 inches. 
Purchased from A. S. Drey, Munich. 



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27— TABLE ORNAMENT IX THE FORM OF A 
HOUSE 

German: Frankfurt (XVIIth Century) 

(Silver gilt) 

A jumping horse, its fore legs in the air, rests its hind 
legs on an oval base which is richly decorated with 
flowers, two lizards, a tortoise, frogs, and a beetle in high 
relief. Head removable. Frankfurt mark. Maker's 
mark TF. 

Height, 10 inches. 

Purchased from A. S. Drey, Munich. 






2H—PAIR OF OVAL BOXES 

Augsburg (early XVIIIth Century) 

(Silver gilt) 

Hinged and locked lids. Decorated with gadrooning on 
sides and top. In the center of the top leaf motive. 
Marked with the pine-cone of Augsburg and maker's 
mark L R. Works of this master described by Rosen- 
berg, No. 331, two of which are dated 1708 and 1712. 

Size, 91/4 by 6% inches. 
Purchased from M. Fridel, Paris. 



29— BRASS SANCTUARY LAMP 

Italian: Venetian (XVIIIth Century) 

Heavy bowl, from the outer edge of which project three 
winged genii who serve as attachments for the three 
elaborate supporting chains which are joined together 
above by a carved ball. 

Height of bowl, 24> inches; diameter, 17 inches. 

Purchased from B. Bengniat. 



ITALIAN SCULPTURES 
MARBLE, TERRACOTTA, STUCCO 



No. 30 
MINO DA FIESOLE 

Born ;it Poppi, 1431 ; died in Florence in 1484. Pupil of Desiderio 
da Settignano. Worked in Florence and Rome. Sculptor of portrait 
busts and reliefs. Among his most important, works are the tombs in 
the Badia at Florence and in St. Peter and St. Maria sopra Minerva 
in Rome. 

MADONNA AND CHILD 

(Middle relief, marble) 

Half length. The Madonna is seen in profile turned toward 
the left with her hands folded in adoration of the sleeping Child, 
who half sits, half reclines on a pillow before her, His head rest- 
ing drowsily on His left hand. With His right hand He holds 
a long scroll and at the same time points with His forefinger to 
the inscription thereon: EGO ■ DORMIO ■ TE COR 
MEUM • VIGILAT. The Child is naked save for a slight 
drapery, the Madonna clothed in a veil which covers her head 
and is edged with a reeded border. The sleeves of her dress 
are of fine material, fastened by little buttons on the under side 
of the arm. 

Height, 231/2 inches; width, 17% inches. 

This relief is undoubtedly by the same hand as the Crucifixion in 
S. Balbina and the Ciborium in S. Maria Maggiore, both in Rome (com- 
pare especially the Nativity and Adoration of the Child and the relief 
of the Virgin, signed "Opus Mini" in the latter work). Both of these 
have been published by Dr. Bode (Denkmaler d'er Renaissance Sculptur) 
as two of the most important works of the Roman period of Mino da 
Fiesole. This relief was probably executed at about the same time, 
c. 1460-70. 

Purchased from Seligmanti cy Co. 



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No. 31 
FOLLOWER OF MICHELANGELO 

FLORENTINE (about 1520-1530) 
A YOUTH 

(Full round, nearly life size, marble. On a low plinth) 

Nude figure standing languidly with the right foot and left 
arm set back in contraposition, the left foot placed forward, 
the right hand, in which a stone (?) is held, bent in front of 
the breast. The youth rests his left hand on a dolphin beside 
him. 

This figure was undoubtedly made by a Florentine artist about 
1520-30 under the influence of the early works of Michelangelo. The 
elegant pose reminds one of the Giovannino in the Berlin Museum. 
There are also resemblances to the works of Domenico Poggini al- 
though this figure seems less stiff than the signed works of that 
sculptor. 

Height, 51 J/2 inches. 

Purchased through Mr. Charles Loeser, Florence. 



No. 32 
GIOVANNI DA BOLOGNA 



\1^ 



Born lit Douai, 1534; died in 1608. Worked in Florence, Bologna 
and other Italian cities. One of the most important sculptors in Italy 
during the hitter part of the sixteenth century. 

CROUCHING VENUS 

(Full round, nearly life size, alabaster) 

The nude goddess kneels as though just coming from the bath. 
Her right hand is raised across her breast to comb her long 
hair, the lower end of which is held in her left hand. Her right 
knee rests on the floor, with the left leg half bent. Her head 
is turned so that she can glance back over her right shoulder. 
The figure appears to make almost a complete turn and is 
sculptured so that it can be seen with equal advantage from all 
sides. 

Height, 29 inches. 

Exhibited in the Metropolitan Museum, Xeio York, 1910. 
Purchased through Mr. Charles Loeser, Florence. 



No. 33 
ATTRIBUTED TO ANDREA DELLA ROBBIA 

Born in Florence in 14:35; died in France in 1525. Nephew of 
Luca della Robbia, and his pupil. While Luca worked mostly in 
Florence, the works of Andrea are distributed all over Tuscany. 

MADONNA AND CHILD lOO^ 

(High relief, tondo, enameled terracotta) 

Half-length figure of the Virgin carrying on her left arm 
the nude Christ Child while with her right hand she gently 
supports His body. She bends her head toward His but turns 
her eyes downward. The Child raises His right hand in an 
attitude of benediction and elasps a bird in His left. His eyes 
are turned toward his mother. Both figures have halos. The 
figures are covered with white enamel, the eyes painted in with 
manganese purple. The background light blue enamel. Frame 
ornamented with the classical egg-and-dart molding in white. 

Diameter, 211/2 inches. 

Under the name of Andrea della Robbia in the collection of 
Baron Lanna in Prague, sold in Berlin in 1909; catalogue No. 472 
and plate No. -10. A. Marquand, "Della Robbias in America," 1912, 
No. 67, with reproduction, calls attention to the similarity between this 
Madonna and that in Giovanni della Robbia's lunette in S. Maria 
Novella, and to the still closer resemblance this bears to the work of 
Benedetto da Majano. He attributed it to a follower of the latter 
and thinks it may possibly be an early work of Giovanni's. Among 
the works from the studio of the Delia Robbias, this is undoubtedly 
one of the most charming and important owned in this country. 

Purchased froiti Seligmann cy Co. 



No. 34 

STYLE OF ANDREA DELLA ROBBIA 
(BENEDETTO BUGLIONI?) 

FLORENTINE (late XVth Century) 



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MADONNA ADORING THE CHILD, WITH AN 
ANGEL 

(High relief, tondo, enameled terracotta) 

The Madonna kneels to the right with folded hands looking 
down at the Child, who lies in a helpless and restless position 
to the left and raises His hands to her. An angel on the extreme 
left supports the infant Christ. Both look toward the 
Madonna. Around the medallion a heavy garland of flowers 
and fruit. The figures in white upon a light blue ground. The 
garland chiefly in green and yellow. 

Diameter, 37 inches. 

Formerly in the Molinier Collection in Paris, reproduced as frontis- 
piece in the catalogue. Described by A. Marquand: "Delia Robbias in 
America," No. 56. Professor Marquand lias rightly observed that the 
composition occurs again in a similar execution in the lunette of the 
altar-piece in the church of San Gimignano at Antona, near Massa 
Carrara, a work which has been plausibly attributed to Benedetto 
Buglioni. He further mentions that in the Museum at Berlin, in the 
Vieweg Collection in Braunschweig, and in the Watts Collection at 
Guildford are medallions by the same hand as ours. 

Purchased from the late E. Molinier. 






No. 35 

THE MASTER OF THE MADONNA 
OF THE LILIES 

Late fifteenth century Florentine artist working in the atelier of 
the Delia Robbias. Influenced especially by Antonio Rossellino, some- 
times by Desiderio da Settignano and Benedetto da Majano. 

MADONNA OF THE LILIES SUCKLING THE 
CHILD 

(Middle relief, tondo, enameled terracotta) 

Half-length figure of the Virgin holding the Child with both 
hands to her left breast; she looks downward, her head turned 
toward the right. Both Mother and Child have halos. Behind 
the Virgin the suggestion of a landscape and two stalks of 
lilies. The figures are white with touches of manganese on the 
eyes; the background is light blue. 

Diameter, 28 inches. 

Described by A. Marquand : "Delia Robbias in America," No. 65, 
with reproduction. Professor Marquand has grouped the works of 
this master together and attributed to him in this country the Madonna 
from the Hainauer Collection in Mr. Charles P. Taft's possession and 
another in the collection of Mr. Henry Walters in Baltimore. 

Purchased from Seligmann <§• Co. 



No. 36 
ATELIER OF THE DELLA ROBBIAS 

FLORENTINE (about 1500) 
PAIR OF DOLPHIN-HANDLED VASES 



(Enameled terracotta) 



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The vases resemble somewhat an antique amphora in form. 
Around the neck and on the shoulders of each is a scale pattern, 
while the upper part of the body is encircled by a band of 
interlacing strap-work. The lower part of the body is covered 
with gadrooning. Two handles in the form of dolphins. A 
removable bunch of fruit and leaves is set in each vase. The 
vase is blue, the fruit and foliage yellow, green and manganese. 

Height, 18 inches. 

Similar vases, mostly without the bouquets of fruit, are in the 
Berlin, South Kensington, and other museums. Described by A. Mar- 
quand : "Delia Robbias in America," No. 47-50. Professor Marquand 
refers to two altar-pieces by Giovanni dclla Robbia, where similar vases 
appear as part of the frames. 



Purchased from Harding, London. 



No. 37 
ITALIAN (FLORENTINE?) ARTIST 

(First half of XVth Century) 
Near in style to the so-called Master of the Pellegrini Chapel. 

MADONNA AND CHILD ^^A 

(High relief. Stucco. Polychrome and gilded) 

The Virgin holds the Christ Child seated on her left arm, wrapt 
in the folds of her blue and gold head-scarf; the Virgin's gown, 
like the Child's tunic, is vermilion patterned with gold. Repre- 
sented in half figure; on a base with "A. M." in monogram 
supported by two cherubs between two shield-like projections. 

Height, 20 inches. 

Several examples are known of this relief: at Basio in Reggio 
Emilia, Casa Scaluccia (Venturi, "L'Arte," 1908, p. 300); in Museo 
Nazionale, Florence; in Kaiser Friedrich Museum, Berlin ; in the Louvre, 
Paris, and in the Metropolitan Museum, New York. An analogous 
stucco in the collection of Baron Tucher, Vienna, is ascribed by C. von 
Fabriczy to the Master of the Pellegrini Chapel. Venturi ascribes a 
like example in the Berlin Museum and other similar pieces to a Flor- 
entine popular school contemporary with the early development of 
Luca della Robbia. (Storia del arte italiana, 1908, VI, p. 228.) 

Purchased from Glisenti, Florence, 



No. 38 

ITALIAN (FLORENTINE?) ARTIST 

(XVth Century) M (/ 

Working aftek BENEDETTO DA MAJANO: FLOR- 
ENTINE, 1442-1479 

MADONNA AND CHILD WITH ST. JOHN 

(Middle relief, colored stucco) 

Behind a balustrade the Virgin is seen in three-quarter length 
slightly turned to the left holding the nude Christ Child. With 
her right hand she raises that of the Child so that He may bless 
the young St. John on the left who looks upward in adoration. 
In front of the balustrade is a large cherub head with wings 
in red and gold. 

H eight, 301/4 inches; width, 22 inches. 

This stucco exists in several replicas and is executed after a com- 
position by Benedetto da Majano. 

Purchased from GUsenti, Florence. 



No. 39 
ITALIAN (FLORENTINE?) ARTIST 

(XVth Century) 
Working after LUCA DELLA ROBBIA (Florentine, 1399-1482). 

MADONNA AND CHILD 

(Middle relief, colored stucco) 

The Virgin is sitting in profile facing the left and holds the 
Child on her lap. The Child looks up to His mother and 
grasps with His left hand the mantle which covers her shoul- 
ders, while with his right He holds the drapery which is wound 
around His body. In the background the suggestion of a tree. 
Frame with two nude putti on both sides holding garlands 
above their heads. Cartouches on the top and bottom of the 
frame. 

Height, 30 inches; width, 21 inches. 

The original in glazed terracotta after which this stucco is executed 
exists in several replicas, one of the best being in the Beckerath Collec- 
tion in Berlin. 

The frame proves that this replica was executed in the middle of 
the sixteenth century, showing how late the fifteenth century sculptures 
were imitated in Italy. 

Purchased from Glisenti, Florence. 



No. 40 
ITALIAN ARTIST 



(XVIIth Century) 

MADONNA AND CHILD 



I 



(Stucco, full round, unfinished at the back) 

The Virgin, clad in a wide mantle and a flowing veil, is seated 
on a stone bench. With her right arm she holds the nude 
Child, who stands with one leg on the bench and the other on 
the lap of the Virgin, who clasps His foot in her left hand. He 
embraces His Mother with both arms and looks up into her 
eyes. 

Figures one-third life size. Remains of paint on the costume of 
the Virgin. 

Height, 26 inches. 
Purchased through Stanford White. 







No. 41 
WHITE MARBLE BASIN 

ITALIAN (XVIth Century) 

In the form of a child's sarcophagus rounded at the two outer 
corners and carved on the front with a mask flanked by ara- 
besques and foliage. Supported on two lion-footed rests. A 
modern fountain-head in the form of a lion mask rests on the 
edge of the basin. 

Length, 49 inches; width, 22l/o inches. 

Height on feet, 25 inches. 

No. 42 
PORPHYRY MORTAR AND PESTLE 

ITALIAN: SIENESE (XVIth Century) 

Heavy apothecary's mortar with rounded edge, in the form of 
a classical urn. Pestle of porphyry with wooden handle. 

Height, 10 inches; diameter, 11 inches. 






°* 



BRONZES 



No. 43 
ETRUSCAN ARTIST 

(VI-Vtii Century, B.C.) 

RECLINING WOMAN 

(Statuette, bronze) 

She leans on her left arm, from which the hand is missing. 
Clothed in long draperies arranged in archaic folds. Her hair 
is long and falls behind her back. 

Height, 2 inches; length, 2% inches. 

No. 44 
ETRUSCAN ARTIST 

(VI-Vth Century, B.C.) 
A MAN 

(Statuette, bronze) 

Bearded, standing, partly clad in drapery arranged in archaic 
folds. He holds a round vase on his left shoulder. On a 
round plinth. 

Height, 33/± inches. 

No. 45 
ETRUSCAN ARTIST 

(VI-IVth Century, B.C.) 

A YOUNG MAX 

(Statuette, bronze. Green patina) 

Standing, completely nude, with arms at the side and left leg 
slightly advanced. 

Height, 3% inches. 



MAHSYAS 



No. 46 
FLORENTINE ARTIST 

(End of XVth Century) 
(Statuette, gilt bronze) 



(A' 



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Nude figure, standing on a plinth. He rests on the right 
foot with the left slightly drawn backward, and originally held 
in both hands a flute which is now missing. Thick, roughly 
curled hair and mustache. 

Height, 11 inches. 

This statuette resembles in style the works by Antonio Pollaiuolo 
and Bellano, except in that it is treated in a more decorative way. As 
the holes in the body and pedestal show, the figure very likely formed a 
part of a casket or larger group to which it was attached by screws. 



Purchased from M. Fridel, Paris. 



No. 47 
RIGGIO (ANDREA BRIOSGO, called RIGGIO) 

Sculptor, born in 1470, at Padua; died there in 1532. Most im- 
portant master working' in bronze statuettes, plaquettes and medaUrrrT 
Northern Italy in the Quattrocento. N 

/fill 

TWO SATYRS PLAYING BALL 

(Statuettes, bronze, gilt) 

Two nude satyrs with shaggy goat-legs. Their heads, with 
curly hair and double-pointed beards, are turned toward each 
other and thrown baek laughingly. The one has his right arm 
raised as if to throw a missing ball, the other stretches up 
his left arm as if to catch it. 

Height, 8 inches. 

Replicas of these figures are in the possession of Mr. William Bennett 
in London (exhibited in the Burlington Club, 1912, Catalogue Mac- 
lagan, Nos. 65 and 69), differing only in that they are connected by a 
chain and retain the ball missing in our example. 

Purchased from M '. Fridel, Paris. 



No. 48 
FRANCESCO DA SANT' AGATA 

Sculptor. Worked in Verona and Padua about U90-1520( ?). 

A YOUTH 

(Statuette, bronze. Light brown patina) 

The nude figure is resting on the right foot, with the left drawn 
back. Both arms are crossed above the head, which is slightly 
turned to the left. The eyes are half closed. 

Height, 8 inches. 

The only signed statuette by Francesco da Sant' Agata is one in 
boxwood in the Wallace Collection. Based on this work, Dr. Bode has 
assigned to the artist a number of bronze statuettes, mostly influenced 
by classical works, including this one. It has rightly been suggested 
that the artist was influenced in this composition by one of the classical 
statues of Hypnos. Although the cast is not one of the earliest, it 
cannot be later than the seventeenth century. Other replicas of the 
same figure are in the Berlin Museum, in the collection of Mr. J. P. 
Morgan, and in private possession in Munich. 

Formerly in the Mannheim Collection, Paris. 



No. 49 
FOLLOWER OF DONATELLO 

PADUAN (XVth Century) 

BRONZE INKSTAND IN THE FOR 31 OF A 
CASKET 

Oblong in form, resting on claw and ball feet surmounted by 
the grotesque bodies and heads of bearded old men. Decorated 
on the sides with centaurs ridden by nymphs and supporting 
garlands enclosing portrait heads of young men in high relief; 
at the ends Gorgon heads and on the lid full-length cupids 
holding ribbons which bind a garland enclosing, in the form of 
a medallion, a Gorgon head. 

Height, i inches; length, H 1 ^ inches; breadth, 4!/L> inches. 

An almost identical inkstand in the collection of Mr. J. Pierpont 
Morgan, illustrated in Dr. Bode's catalogue, Xo. 68, Plate XLI. It 
exists in several replicas and is usually ascribed to Caradosso. How- 
ever, Dr. Bode states rightly that the work is more in the style of the 
school of Donatello and does not show much similarity to the known 
works of Caradosso. 

Formerly in the Mannheim Collection, Paris. 



No. 50 
FLORENTINE ARTIST 

(Middle of XVIth Century) 

ANATOMICAL FIGURE 

(Statuette, bronze. Dark lacquered patina) 



1.1 



A standing male figure, the left arm raised above the head, 
the right arm lowered to grasp the upper end of a club which 
rests on the ground between the feet. The figure stands on 
the left leg, with the right foot raised from the ground. The 
whole body is twisted in a turn from left to right; the gaze is 
directed upward. 

Height, 7% inches. 

Similar figures in the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Louvre, the 
Berlin Museum, in the collection of Seymour Haden, and elsewhere. 
Formerly statuettes of this type were attributed to Michelangelo or his 
pupils Marco Agrate and Cigoli. In the Renaissance they were con- 
sidered not only as anatomical studies, but also as "memento mori," 
representing the dead raised for judgment. Compare Maclagan's 
catalogue of the exhibition in the Burlington Club, 1912. 

Formerly in the Mannheim Collection, Paris. 



No. 51 

MANNER OF DOMENIGO POGGINI 

(Middle of XVIth Century) 

Born in Florence about 1525; died after 1589. Pupil of Ben- 
venuto Cellini. Influenced by Michelangelo. He was a goldsmith, 
medallist and sculptor in bronze and marble. 

A GLADIATOR 

(Statuette, bronze. Brown lacquered patina) 

Full-length, nude man of slim proportions, upright, as if 
striding forward, his right leg advanced, his head, with thick 
hair, turned to the left. He grasps with his right hand a 
sword, which he is drawing from the scabbard held in his left. 

Height, 8 inches. 

Replica with variations in Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan's Collection, 

described in Dr. W. Bode's catalogue, No. 128, and in the catalogue 

of the exhibition in the Burlington Club, 1912. The correct attribu- 
tion due to Dr. Bode. 

Formerly in the Mannheim Collection, Paris. 



No. 52 
MANNER OF DOMENIGO POGGINI 

(Middle of XVIth Century) 

MAN CARRYING A CHILD 

(Statuette, bronze. Dark brown patina) 

Full-length nude figure of a tall man of muscular build with 
massive throat; his head and whole body are turned to the left. 
He strides forward with the left leg in advance, carrying a 
child on his left shoulder and resting his right hand, in which 
he holds a cloth, on his hip. The child lays his right hand upon 
the man's head and looks down confidingly; in his left hand he 
holds an apple; his upper arm is grasped by the left hand of 
the man. 

Height, 914 inches. 

A similar figure in the collection of Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan 
(catalogue of Dr. W. Bode, No. 1291). The attribution due to Dr. 
Bode. 

Formerly in the Hainauer Collection, Berlin. 






No. 53 
GIOVANNI DA BOLOGNA 



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Sculptor, born in Douai, 1524; died in Florence, 1608. Worked 
in Florence, Bologna, and other Italian cities (See Number 32). 

HERCULES AND THE ARCADIAN STAG 

(Statuette, bronze. Light brown patina) 

The nude Hercules struggles with the stag, grasping the neck 
of the animal with his left hand and bending back its antlers 
with his right. The deer stands on its hind legs with head 
thrown back and open mouth, as if crying in anguish. Her- 
cules is represented as a fully matured man with thick neck 
and bushy hair and beard. 

Height, 1414 inches. 

Part of a series of the "Labors of Hercules." An identical group 
in the Wallace Collection, illustrated in Dr. Bode's "Italian Bronze 
Statuettes," Vol. Ill, Xo. C'XCIX. One of the masterpieces among 
Giovanni da Bologna's bronze statuettes. 

Purchased from J . # S. Goldschmidt. 



No. 54 
MANNER OF GIOVANNI DA BOLOGNA 

(Latter part of the XVIth Century) 

VENUS AT THE BATH 

(Statuette, bronze. Black patina) 



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The nude Venus rests her left arm on a slender classic vase, 
which stands beside her on a pedestal partly covered with 
drapery. The weight of her body is borne on her right leg, 
her left being crossed in front of her so that she may the more 
easily remove her sandal with her right hand. Her hair is 
elaborately dressed. 

Height, 9 inches. 

After a classical statue. Quite in style of the acknowledged works 
of Giovanni da Bologna, showing the same motive as the statuette 
reproduced in Dr. Bode's "Italian Bronze Statuettes," Vol. 3. 

Purchased from M. Fridel, Paris. 



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No. 55 
SCHOOL OF GIOVANNI DA BOLOGNA 

(Latter part of the XVIth Century) 

EQUESTRIAN STATUETTE OF HENRY IV OF 
FRANCE 

(Bronze. Brown patina) 

The king, who is in complete armor save for his head, which 
is uncovered, rides a steed which prances on its hind legs as 
though suddenly reined hack. The king looks down toward 
the ground at the right as if an enemy were lying at the feet 
of the horse. In his right hand Henry holds a short sword, 
while his left grasps the bridle reins, with which he pulls hack 
the head of the horse. The king is bearded, as in his best 
known portraits. 

Height, 7 inches. 

Purchased from M. Fridel, Paris. 



No. 56 
JAGOPO SANSOVINO 

Born in Venice in 14-86; died there in 1570. Worked in Florence, 
Home and Venice. Most important sculptor in Venice during the 
Renaissance. Also an architect. 

TWO CANDLESTICKS IN THE FORM OF PUTTI 

(Statuettes, bronze) 

The two children, nude except for scarfs wound round their 
waists, carry candle sockets shaped like baskets on their shoul- 
ders, the one grasping his burden by the brim, the other by 
the upper part of the body. They are resting one on the right, 
one on the left foot, with the other foot drawn back, each stand- 
ing on a round plinth which rests on an elaborately decorated 
triangular base consisting of three volutes surmounted by 
winged sea-horses and separated by cherub heads. The lowest 
portion of the base is composed of scrolls and acanthus leaves. 

Height, lOVo inches. 

An identical pair of figures were in the Taylor Collection which 
was sold in London in July, 1912; another pair in the collection of Mr. 
E. Simon, in Berlin, reproduced in Dr. Bode's "Italian Bronze Statu- 
ettes," Vol. 3, and attributed to Alessandro Vittoria. 

Purchased from Seligmarm cy Co. 



No. 57 
VENETIAN ARTIST 

(Latk XVIth Century) 

BRONZE INKSTAND 

(Dark patina) 

(tADROONET) urn supported by three winged genii with curly 
hair whose legs terminate at the knees in lion-feet. Between 
the figures free-standing scroll and floral ornaments. On the 
lid a cupid holding part of a how. This figure is a modern 
addition. 

Height, 9 inches. 

The composition is in the style of Alessandro Vittoria and Rocca- 
tagliata. 

Purchased from M. Fridel, Paris. 



No. 58 
FLEMISH ARTIST WORKING IN ITALY 

(Late XVIth Century) 

WRESTLING WOMEN ^ t1/^ 

(Statuette, bronze. Reddish-brown i:>atina) 

Or the two large-limbed women, one stands with outspread 
legs, her right hand on the head and her left on the abdomen 
of her opponent, whom she forces to bend backward. The 
latter grasps the upper left arm of the former with her right 
hand, her left on the other's hip, and struggles as though about 
to yield. 

Height, 8 inches. 

The same group is in the Wallace Collection. Described in Dr. 
Bode's "Italian Bronze Statuettes," Vol. 3. 

Purchased from Gimpel cy Wildenstein. 



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No. 59 
ITALIAN ARTIST 

(Late XYIth Century) 
THE BORGHESE WARRIOR 

(Statuette, bronze. Black patina) 

A reduced copy of the famous classical statue now in the 
Louvre. As in the original the shield and sword blade are 
missing. 

Height, 14 inches. 

A similar figure in the Kaiser Friedrich Museum, reproduced in 
Bode, "Italienische Bronzen, Museum, Berlin," No. 410. 

Purchased from Gimpel c/ Wildenstem. 



No. 60 

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ITALIAN ARTIST 

(Late XVIth Century) 

SATYR, AFTER THE ANTIQUE 

( Statuette, bronze. Brown patina) 



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Full-bodied bearded man, striding forward with the right foot 
in advance and the right hand upraised, holding a curved stick. 
He wears a lion-skin tied around the neck, with the knotted 
claws dangling in front on his chest. The rest of the skin 
falls behind until it is caught up and twisted around the left 
arm. On his head a garland of reeds. 

Height, 13 inches. 

Purchased from M. F ridel, Paris. 



No. 61 
ITALIAN ARTIST ^ tf 

(XVIIIth Century) 

BRONZE APOTHECARY'S MORTAR 

Bell-shaped., on a low foot, decorated on the outside with 
fillets, with the monogram "S M," crowned, and with lilies on 
one side and figures of the Virgin with the Angel of the An- 
nunciation on the other. Handles ornamented with human 
heads. 

Height, 6'v4 inches; diameter, 8 inches. 



No. 62 
ITALIAN ARTIST 

(XVIIIth Century) 
BRONZE APOTHECARY'S MORTAR 



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In the shape of an inverted bell on a low foot. Decorated on 
the outside with fillets and cartouches. Two handles in the 
form of human heads. 

Height, 7 inches; diameter, 8^/2 inches. 



FRENCH SCULPTURES 



No. 63 
FRENCH ARTIST OF ABOUT 1500 

Probably from the North of France. 

KING CLOTAIRE AND AN ATTENDANT 

(Wood, with remains of painting) 



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Part of a large group forming a single unit in an altar-piece 
dedicated to Saint Eloi. The King stands in front clad in 
a long gown, over which is a garment with full sleeves, shaped 
like a dalmatic, originally painted blue and patterned with 
fleurs-de-lys. An ample cloak fastened on the right shoulder 
and a flat-brimmed hat surmounted by a royal circlet com- 
posed of fleurs-de-lys complete his costume. He is turned 
to the right and looks downward. In his left hand he holds a 
sceptre (?), the upper part of which is missing. Behind him 
on a higher level stands an attendant clothed in a skirted, 
full-sleeved garment and a flat hat, and resting his right hand 
on a partly destroyed staff. 

Height, 21 inches. 

From the altar-piece of St. Eloi, in a church at Recloses, Province 
of Seine-et-Marne. A cast of this sculpture, together with the miss- 
ing portion of the same group, is in the Musee de Sculpture Com- 
paree (Trocadero), Paris. The other part of the group consists of 
two figures : St. Eloi as a goldsmith, with an attendant, displaying to 
King Clotaire the two gold and jeweled saddles which the Saint has 
made at the King's order out of the material allotted for one. The 
first saddle rests on the ground, and toward it the gaze of the King 
is directed ; the other is held in the hands of St. Eloi's attendant. The 
making of these two saddles (or thrones, according to some versions) 
out of the precious materials assigned for one was St. Eloi's first 
noteworthy achievement. It was considered such a proof of honesty 
that he at once was taken into favor by the King, whose successor, 
Dagobert, continued to employ Eloi on many important works. 
Eventually Eloi gave up the goldsmith's trade and was made Bishop of 
Noyon, becoming in time the patron saint of goldsmiths, armorers and 
workers in metal. 

Purchased from Seligmann <§* Co. 



No. 64 
FRENCH ARTIST: SCHOOL OF THE LOIRE 

(About 1500) 
SAINT SYLVESTER, BISHOP OF ROi 

(Wall statue, limestone, remains of coloring) 



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The saint is represented as Pope, with his attribute, the bull, 
by his side. Over a long, girdled alb Saint Sylvester wears 
a cope which reveals the amice at the throat and the stole 
crossed in front of his breast. On his head the triple tiara. 
The right arm is raised in benediction. The left arm is missing. 

Height, 31 inches. 

Saint Sylvester (died .'335 A.D.) converted Constantine, who made 
him Bishop of Rome. The hull, his symbol, was restored by him to life 
after being killed by a magician who said he knew the name of the 
Omnipotent and whispered the name in the ear of the animal, upon 
which the hull fell dead. Sylvester said the deed was done in the name 
of Satan and revived the animal by making - the sign of the cross over it. 






No. 65 

FRENCH ARTIST : SCHOOL OF THE LOIRE 

(About 1500) 

SAINT BLAISE (.?), BISHOP OF SE BASTE IN 
CAPPADOCIA 

(Wall statue, limestone, with traces of color) 

The saint is represented as bishop, wearing a long cope over 
an alb and a dalmatic. About his neck is an appareled amice 
and on his head a high mitre. In his left hand he holds the 
pastoral staff, the upper part of which is missing, while with 
his right he makes the gesture of benediction. "Saint 
Blaise" (?) on the plinth, in Gothic letters. 

Height, 37 inches. 

Saint, Blaise was patron saint of Ragusa and healer of diseases 
of the throat. He died in 289 A.D. 



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No. 66 
FRENCH ARTIST: ILE DE FRANCE 

(About 1500) 

PAIR OF CONSOLES 

(Middle relief, limestone) 



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The under part of each console is decorated with the half 
figure of an angel garbed as a choir boy holding the liturgical 
book and singing. Each wears a hooded cope fastened in front 
with a large morse. Fillets are bound around their flowing 
hair. Their large wings are spread out on either side and 
curve inward toward the bottom. 

Height, 19 inches; width, IIV2 inches; depth, 8I/0 inches. 



GERMAN SCULPTURE 



No. 67 
MANNER OF KONRAD MEIT 

Born in Worms, after 1514. Court Sculptor of Margarita of 
Austria in Brussels; in 1536 member of the Guild in Antwerp. Most 
important sculptor in the Netherlands during the early Renaissance. 



ADAM AND EVE 

(Full round, boxwood) 



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Small nude figures. Adam stands with the right leg behind 
the left, stretching his left hand out to Fve, who gives him the 
apple. He has bushy hair and is meagerly proportioned. Fve 
stands with the left leg behind the right and, smiling, turns 
her head toward him. Her hair hangs loosely. On small rec- 
tangular plinths. 

Height, 5% inches. 

These two remarkable carvings were executed about 1520 and 
show much resemblance to the works of Konrad Meit (compare, for 
instance, the treatment of the faces and the hair with the portrait 
figures on the tombs in St. Nicholas de Tolentin at Brou). Figures of 
the same style attributed to Konrad Meit are in the Museum at Vienna 
and in Gotha. 

Purchased from Seligmann <§* Co. 









FURNITURE 

ENGLISH, ITALIAN, FRENCH 
SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE 

OF THE 

XVth, XVIth, XVIIth AND XVIIIth CENTURIES 



68— TWO WALNUT SAVONAROLA CHAIRS 
ITALIAN: FLORENTINE (XVth Century) 



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Or the shape known as Savonarola or X chairs, with 
back and arms. One chair has conventionalized lion feet. 
The back and seat covered with sixteenth century gold 
embroidery on red velvet. 

Height, 36 inches; width, 25% inches; depth, 19V2 inches. 
Purchased from the late E. Molinier, Paris. 



69— TWO WALNUT ARMCHAIRS 

ITALIAN: FLORENTINE (second hai/ of XVIth Cen- 
tury) 

Rectangular seat, resting on four straight legs, carved 
with guilloches and connected in front by an elaborate 
stretcher. The back is composed of two straight posts 
with acanthus-leaf finials, joined by a broad cushioned 
rest. Back and seat cushioned in old red velvet orna- 
mented with sixteenth century embroidery in gold. 

Height of back, 43 inches. 

Purchased from the late E. Molinier, Paris. 



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70— FOUR WALNUT CHAIRS 

ITALIAN (second half of XVIth Century) 

Square seats with straight legs and high backs. The legs 
are joined in front by a wide stretcher in pierced carving. 
Similar stretchers are twice repeated in the back. 
Cushions of old red velvet. 

Height of back, 47 inches. 



71— WALNUT CACQUETOIRE CHAIR 

FRENCH (middle of XVIth Century) 

Flaking seat with straight sides, supported on two carved 
and two plain legs connected at the foot by stretchers. 
The back rectangular and high, topped by an ornament 
of scrolls, strap-work and honeysuckle motives. The 
central panel is decorated with similar ornaments and 
surrounded by a rope molding. An egg and dart pattern 
on the rail supporting the seat. Flat, curving arms sup- 
ported by four turned posts. Cushion of old red velvet. 

Height, 54 inches. 

Illustrated as a typical cacquetoire chair by Henri Havard, 
"Dictionnaire de l'ameublement," Vol. I, p. 607, fig. 422. 



72— WALNUT CACQUETOIRE CHAIR 

FRENCH (middle of XVIth Century) 



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Flaring seat with straight sides, supported on four 
turned legs connected at the foot by stretchers. The 
back rectangular and high, topped by an ornament of 
scrolls, strap-work and honeysuckle motives. The central 
panel is decorated with similar ornaments and surrounded 
by a broad guilloche. Curving arms supported by two 
turned posts. A similar guilloche on the rail supporting 
the seat. Cushion of old red velvet. 

Height, 54 inches. 





73— TWO SMALL FOLDING CHAIRS 



FRENCH (early XVIIth Century) 



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( Pine ( ?) stained black) 

Made in X form with back. Stretchers front and back 
just above the feet. Openwork backs composed of 
twisted columns connected above by arches. The 
stretchers, legs and posts are carved with a flat, incised 
pattern derived mostly from thistles or oak leaves. The 
upper stretchers of the back, however, show figure sub- 
jects, on one chair the sacrifice of Isaac by Abraham, 
on the other Christ and the Woman of Samaria. The 
seats are covered with cushions of Venetian velvet of the 
period. 

Height of back, 28 inches. 




4 



74— TWO ARMCHAIRS 



PORTUGUESE (early XVIIIth Century) 

(Wood, painted black, with carving picked out in gold) 

The curving seat is supported by four cabriole legs with 
lion-feet connected by stretchers. The back consists of a 
broad upright panel carved with conventionalized roses, 
from which the arms curve downwards to the seat. 
Cushion of seventeenth century crimson brocade, trimmed 
with galloon. 

Height of back, 40!/2 inches. 



75— FOUR SCONCES 

SPANISH (XVIth Century) 

(Wood, painted and gilded) 

Each sconce consists of an heraldic eagle with out- 
stretched wings, its breast charged with a large spade- 
shaped armorial shield with many quarterings, sur- 
mounted by a crown. The five candle brackets and 
sockets are modern additions. 

Purchased through Stanford White. 



76— THREE OAK JOINT STOOLS 

ENGLISH (XVIIth Century) 



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Four turned legs, inclined slightly inward toward the 
top, and connected at the bottom by rectangular 
stretchers. 



77— OAK ARMCHAIR WITH PANELED BACK 

ENGLISH (XVIIth Century) 

Two turned and two plain legs, rectangular seat, and 
paneled back, bordered by a guilloche. On either corner 
of the back a simple pointed ornament. 

Height of back, 45^2 inches. 



78— FOUR GILT BRONZE PROCESSIONAL LAN- 
TERNS J 

ITALIAN: VENETIAN (XVIIIth Century) 

The six-sided lantern rests on a reeded bowl which is 
supported by three cupids. Above the domed top of the 
lantern is a miniature weather vane in the form of a 
banner ornamented with Lion of St. Mark. Poles 
covered with crimson velvet and circled by gilded metal 
bands, resting on the floor in marble sockets carved with 
cherubs' heads. 

Total height, 10 feet. 



79— LONG WALNUT SEAT 

In the style of the XVIth Century 



9 



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Long bench without back, and in three divisions, sepa- 
rated by arms in the form of sea-horses. The lower part 
is faced with fine decorative panels, French carving of 
the sixteenth century, strongly under Italian influence. 
Cushions of old red velvet. 

Height, 29 1 /i> inches; depth, 31 inches; length, 9 feet 10 inches. 

Purchased from the late E. Molinier, Paris. 



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80— WALNUT TABLE 

ITALIAN (in the style of the XVth Century) 

Hexagonal top supported on three large carved S scrolls 
which are jointed together near the bottom. The top and 
lower part did not belong together originally. 



Height, 31 inches; diameter of top, 40 inches. 




81— WALNUT TABLE 

ITALIAN (in the. style of the XVIth Century) 

Oblong top supj>orted at the ends by pedestals com- 
posed of two columns on either side of a winged terminal 
figure. These supports are connected at the bottom by a 
heavy stretcher which rests on the floor and is ornamented 
with a carved pattern. 

Height, 34 inches; width, 26 inches; length, 59 inches. 



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82— WALNUT TABLE 

ITALIAN (in the style of the XVIth Century) 

A rectangular top bordered with nulling, supported on 
four legs carved and connected near the bottom by simply 
ornamented stretchers. At the top the legs are joined 
by four deep rails carved with a floral border. In the 
middle of the side rails a simple circular medallion. 

Length, 83 inches; height, 34<l/o inches; breadth, 32 inches. 



V 

83— WALNUT table 



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ITALIAN (in the style of the XVIth Century) 

Rectangular removable top with four drawers beneath. 
The whole supported on two heart-shaped pedestals 
carved with cartouches and cherubs' heads and resting on 
bases ornamented with acanthus leaves. 

Height, 32^ inches; width, 47 inches; depth, 24 inches. 



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84— WALNUT TABLE 



ITALIAN: FLORENTINE (XVIth Century) 

Square top, with corners chamfered to form an uneven 
octagon, supported on four consoles carved with cary- 
atides and terminating at the bottom in lion-feet resting 
on an octagonal base. The consoles radiate from a central 
pedestal, to which they are attached. 

Height, 33% inches; width, 38^ inches. 

Purchased from Stefano Bardini, Florence. 



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85— PAIR OF WALNUT CHESTS, OR CASSONI 

ITALIAN: ROMAN (middle of XVIth Century) 

The shape is an adaptation of the Roman sarcophagus, 
the lower part heing convex, the upper concave. The 
■moldings of the lid are covered with the acanthus leaf and 
other designs. The decoration of the lower half consists 
of a coat-of-arms in the middle, from which start heavy- 
scrolls of foliage and flowers. The two middle scrolls 
each surround a grotesque figure which supports the 
coat-of-arms. On the corners in high relief four putti 
with centaurs' feet and floriated tails. The concave 
molding is decorated with a honeysuckle ornament. 

Length, 67 inches; height, 24 inches; width, 22^2 inches. 

These cassoni were probably made in Rome at the workshop of 
the Tatti and represent, the best style of later Renaissance chests. 

Purchased from SeUgmann <§* Co. 



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86— WALNUT CHEST, OR CASSONE 

ITALIAN: ROMAN (middle ok the XVIth Century) 

The chest, which is profusely decorated with figures and 
ornaments in high relief, is in the shape of a Roman sar- 
cophagus supported on four lion-feet, and covered by a 
deep lid with a heavy hasp and padlock in wrought iron. 
The incurving sides of the lower part of the chest are 
decorated with a relief of Apollo slaying the sons and 
daughters of Niohe. On the corners are figures of four 
muscular, bearded men, partly draped. A garland of oak- 
leaves separates the lower part of the chest from the 
upper, which is ornamented with a border of acanthus 
scrolls. The moldings about the lid resemble in profile 
the plinth of a column and are decorated with simple 
leaf and scale patterns. The lock is a later addition of 
the eighteenth century. 

Length, 65 inches; height, 29 inches; width, 22 inches. 

Remarkably fine example of the late Renaissance type, very likely 
from the workshop of the Tatti, in Rome. We find the same motif, 
Apollo and Diana slaying the Sons and Daughters of Niohe, on one of 
the finest chests in the Berlin Museum. 

Purchased from Selignumn $ Co. 



87— CHEST, OR CASSONE 



7 



NORTH ITALIAN: VENETIAN(P) (late XVth Cen- 
tury) 

(Wood, covered with gesso, gilded and painted) 

Oblong shape with straight sides, except for a retreating 
member at the bottom. Around the top a heavy molding 
underneath the edge of the lid. The middle part of the 
cover raised in a rectangular panel surrounded by a 
border with a blue background. Lion feet. Decorated 
all over in low relief, with foliated ornaments in gilded 
stucco. The front is divided in three panels, the largest 
in the center containing a cartouche painted with a coat- 
of-arms and surrounded by scrolls of vine leaves. Similar 
leaf design in the two smaller panels and on the ends of 
the chest. The molding in the lower part is decorated 
with a running design of vine leaves interrupted in the 
middle and at the corners by acanthus leaves. The flat 
gilded surface of the stiles and rails is ornamented with 
fine incised patterns. 

Length, 67 inches; height, 27 inches; width, 231/2 inches. 
Purchased from Seligmann <§• Co. 



88— INLAID WALNUT WRITING DESK 



C\ frO 



NORTH ITALIAN: MANTUA (beginning of XVItii Cen- 
tury) 

In two parts, the lower closed by two small doors, the 
upper by the writing flap, hinged at the bottom. The 
two lower doors are each divided into two panels con- 
taining an interlacing pattern in low relief and can be 
opened by means of two carved brass pulls in the shape 
of double-tailed mermaids. On either side of the doors 
is a lion-footed sphinx in high relief resting on a console 
and bearing on its head a mask which can be pulled out 
to serve as a support for the writing flap when lowered. 
The front of the flap is inlaid with a beribboned wreath 
containing three heraldic devices, the inside with a 
checker board. Within are small drawers each inlaid 
with a letter, and each mounted with a mermaid pull in 
brass, similar to those below. The ends of the desk have 
elaborate moldings surrounding diamond-shaped panels, 
containing handles of wrought iron, for use in lifting the 
desk. 

Height, 5 feet 1 [''■> 'unites; width, l -i feet 5 inches; depth, 
1 foot 11 inches. 

Similar in type to the writing desk said to have been made 
for the Gonzaga family and now in the Victoria and Albert 
Museum. 



Purchased from Seligmarm Sf Co. 



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89— OAK CHOIR STALL 

FRENCH GOTHIC (XVth Century) 



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Straight back with carved molding on the top, the two 
parcloses or side pieces ending in a quarter circle to 
which are attached two carved figures, on the right a 
woman with an open book, on the left a man holding a 
bunch of fruit. The lower edge of each parclose is 
carved in a scale pattern. Two small consoles serve as 
supports to the seat, which can be turned up to show the 
misericorde underneath, carved with a human face. On 
the ends of the stall sharply pointed linen-fold pattern. 

Height, 351/0 inches; width, 29 inches; depth, 17 inches. 

Purchased from Seligmann ty Co. 



90— WALNUT CEILING 

ITALIAN: FLORENTINE (XVth Century) 

Divided into three main parts which are subdivided into 
rather deep cofferings. On the intersections of the finely 
molded beams are circular ornaments in brass. 

Length, 21 feet 10 inches; breadth, 19 feet 10 inches. 



91— DOORWAY 

ITALIAN (dated 15(j2) 

(Wood, covered with gesso, gilded) 

Two fluted Corinthian columns carry an entablature con- 
sisting of an architrave with elaborate moldings; a frieze 
ornamented with an oblong panel painted blue, bearing 
the date, and two heavy garlands; and a rich cornice. 

Outside measurements : 

Height, 11 feet 2 inches; width, 10 feet 6 inches. 
Inside measurements : 

Height, 7 feet 7 inches; width, 6 feet. 



FURNITURE 

UPHOLSTERY IN VELVETS AND DAMASKS 
OF THE XVIth AND XVIIth CENTURIES 



92 — Three Pairs of Curtain Rests 

Modern, in the sixteenth century Italian style. Bronze. 
Designed by Stanford White. 

92a — Three Pairs of Curtain Rests 

Modern, in the style of the Italian Renaissance. Brass. 
Designed by Stanford White. 

93 — Three Pairs of Curtain Rests 

Modern, in the style of Louis XVI. Figures of Satyrs 
and Bacchantes. Ormolu. Designed by Stanford 
White. 



94— Two Lamps \ ^9 

In the style of the Italian Renaissance. Carved stand- 
ards resembling torcheres. Shades of filet lace over green. 
Walnut. 

Height, with shade, 6 feet 9^2 inches. 



95 — Small Chair 

Upholstered in sixteenth century crimson velvet. 



1 I 



96 — Small Chair 7 ^ 

Upholstered in sixteenth century crimson velvet. 

97 — Small Chair 

Modern, upholstered in seventeenth century Venetian} 
crimson damask. 

98 — Armchair / / 

Modern ; upholstered in sixteenth century crimson velvet. 
Loose seat cushion. One other cushion. 

99 — Armchair V ' 

Modern; upholstered in sixteenth century crimson velvet. 



/ 



100 — Armchair 

Modern; upholstered in seventeenth century Venetian 
crimson damask. 

101 — Armchair V v j 

Modern; upholstered in seventeenth century Venetian • 
crimson damask. 

103— Sofa 

Modern; upholstered in seventeenth century crimson 
Venetian damask, trimmed with galloon. Curving back 
and arms, loose cushions in the seat. Supported on 
gilded rests in the form of lions. 

Length, 8 feet; height of back, 39 inches. 

104 — Sofa 3\ 

Modern; upholstered in seventeenth century crimson s. 
Venetian damask. With back and arms similar to No. 
103, but smaller and without galloon. Loose seat 
cushion. Two other cushions. Gilded feet in the form 
of lions. 

Length, 6 feet; height of back, 39 inches. 

105— Sofa 

Modern; upholstered in sixteenth century crimson vel- 
vet. Loose seat cushions. Two roll, and four other 
cushions. 

Length, 61 Vi: inches; height of back, 26^ inches. 

106— Sofa . \ 

Modern; upholstered in sixteenth century crimson vel- 
vet. Feet in the form of lions. 

Length, 5 feet 10 inches; height of back, 29 inches. 

107— Sofa 

Modern; upholstered in sixteenth century crimson velvet. 

Length, 6 feet 4 inches; height of back, 24 inches. 



^ 



CUSHIONS, PORTIERES AND LACE 

CURTAINS 



108 — Cushion 

Made of sixteenth century Italian materials, covered on 
one side with a design of arabesques executed in applique 
and embroidery, surrounding a central medallion of the 
Transfiguration. \f > * 

Size: Length, 19 inches; width, 16 inches. 



109 — Three Cushions 

Made of sixteenth century Italian materials. One side , 
covered with old gold embroidery on a crimson velvet 
ground. 

Size, 20 by 16 inches. 



110 — Two Cushions 

Made of sixteenth century Italian materials. On the »~-\ 
one side elaborate embroidery in gold and colors on a *- > ~ 
crimson velvet ground of arabesques surrounding medal- 
lions of the Madonna and a Saint. Backs of old Genoese 
crimson velvet. 

Size, 20 by 16 inches. 



Ill — Cushion 

Made of sixteenth century Italian materials. The front 
covered with portions of orphreys embroidered in gold 
on a crimson velvet ground. Back of seventeenth cen- 
tury damask. 

Size, 18 by 21 inches. 



112 — Three Cushions 

Ornamented with seventeenth century Flemish embroid- 
ery. The front of each covered with portion of an 
orphrey, worked in gold and color and showing the half 
figure of a saint. 

Size: Length, 20 inches; width, 14 inches. 



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V 






113 — -Cushion 

Made of eighteenth century Spanish materials. Old red 
velvet with hood of a cope applied to one side, embroid-y2 f (J 
ered in gold and color, and edged with deep gold fringe. 
In the center a medallion of the Madonna surrounded 
by cherubim. 

Size: Length, 23 inches; width, 20 inches. 



114 — Cushion 

Made of eighteenth century Spanish materials. Old red 
velvet with hood of cope applied to one side, decorated 
with floral pattern embroidered in silver and color anew 
edged with gold fringe. In the center a device of the cross 
and chalice. 

Size, 26 by 26 inches. 



115 — Cushion 

Made of eighteenth century Italian materials. Old red ' 
velvet with small ecclesiastical banner embroidered in 
gold and color on deep garnet velvet ground, applied 
to one side. 

Size: Length, 19 inches; width, 23 inches. 



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117 — Three Lace Curtains 

Italian, seventeenth century. Filet and reticello lace and 
network in various patterns. 

Size: Height, 10 feet 2 inches; width, 6 feet 6 inches. 



C7< 

118 — Three Long Lace Curtains J ^ 

Italian, seventeenth century. Filet: edged at the bottom 
with reticello. Subjects: A Nymph and a Satyr; Nep- 
tune with Sea-horses; A Hunter and Hounds. 

Lengths, 11 feet 6 inches; widths, 4 feet. 



119 — Three Long Lace Curtains 

Italian, seventeenth century. Composed of filet and sev- 
eral other varieties of lace. The lower edge bordered with 
reticello. 

Height, 10 feet 4 inches; width, 7 feet. 



120 — Pair or Lace Curtains 

Style of seventeenth century Italian work. Filet. A 
figure in each: (a) Cimabue, with device of palette in the 
upper left hand corner, (b) A warrior, with coat-of- 
arms in similar position. Lower edge of reticello. 

Size: Length, 7 feet 8 inches; width, 2 feet. 



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\ 



121 — Pair of Lace Curtains 

Italian; style of the seventeenth century. Filet. One 
with large figure of griffin, the other with a crowned lion 
holding a shield. Lower edge of reticello. 

Size: Length 5 feet 8 indies; width, 3 feet 7 inches. 



122 — Six Lace Curtains 

Italian; style of the seventeenth century. Filet: variousdyF' 
figures and heraldic animals. 



Size: Length, 9 feet 2 inches; width, 36 inches. 
Size: Length, 6 feet 6 inches; width, 36 inches. 
Size: Length, 5 feet 6 inches; width, 36 inches. 



1/(1 

123 — Two Lace Curtains 

In the style of seventeenth century Italian work. Filet. 
The one shows a female figure under an orange tree, 
the other a man draped in a leopard skin. Lower edge 
of reticello. 

Size: Length, 8 feet 7 inches; rcidth, 2 feet 6 inches. 



EVENING SALE 

FRIDAY, APRIL i, 1913 

IN THE GRAND BALLROOM OF THE PLAZA 

Fifth Avenue,, 58th to 59th Streets 
beginning at 8.45 o'clock 



ITALIAN PAINTINGS 



No. 124 x ] <L CT 



SANDRO BOTTICELLI 



Born at Florence, 144-4 or 1445; died there 1510. Pupil first of 
the goldsmith Botticelli, then of Fra Filippo Lippi, influenced by An- 
tonio Pollaiuolo and Vcrrochio. Worked mostly in Florence; for a 
short time in Rome and Pisa. Painter of allegorical and religious 
subjects and portraits. 

VENUS 

(Tempera on canvas) 

The goddess stands on a marble base, nude except for a 
diaphanous white drapery which she holds with both hands so 
that it covers the lower part of her body and on the right 
falls in many fine folds to the floor. In the main fold of 
the drapery are roses. Two curls of her golden hair fall in 
front, one on either shoulder, while behind her back the mass 
of her hair can be seen hanging down as far as the knees. 
The flesh is silvery white in tone, the pedestal bluish gray, and 
the background a dark neutral tint. 

Height, 57Vi3 indies; width, 25 inches. 

Formerly in the Ferroni Palace in Florence, then in the Bromley 
Davenport, Ashburton, and Northampton collections. For more than 
forty years hidden in a remote country house. Crowe and Cavalcaselle 
were the only modern critics of importance who knew the picture, and 
in the last edition of their "History of Painting" they mention this 
Venus after the "Mars and Venus" of the National Gallery, saying that 
it is better than the other similar representations of the goddess. 

It is obviously allied to the "Birth of Venus" by Botticelli in the 
Fffizi, as the Venus has a somewhat similar pose. In the composition 
and in the drawing of the hands and feet and of the white drapery, it 
reveals the master's sense of design. Vasari in connection with the 
"Birth of Venus" speaks of "diverse feminine ignude" by Botticelli 
which were in Florentine palaces in his day. This may possibly be one 
of the figures referred to by Vasari. Dr. Bode has expressed the opinion 
that this is a genuine work by Botticelli. 

Purchased from Mr. K. Langton Douglas, London. 



No. 125 
FLORENTINE ARTIST (about 1475) 
VIRGIN AND CHILD %X * * 

(Tempera on panel, with arched top. In the original frame) 

Half-length figure of the Virgin, who wears a red dress 
under a dark blue cloak covering her left shoulder. From her 
blond hair falls a white veil which is loosely twisted about her 
neck. She holds the child a little to her left, bending her head 
toward him. The boy stands on a balustrade and seems to 
move from her. Pie is partly dressed in a white drapery and 
in his left hand holds a bird to his lips. Gold halos and back- 
ground incised with rays and dots. 

Height, .'33 inches; -width, 22 inches. 

Similar Madonnas arc in the Fogg Museum at Harvard University, 
in the Kaiser Friedrich Museum in Berlin and in many private collec- 
tions. They are usually attributed to Pier Francesco Fiorentino, but 
this one appears rather to be the work of some closer imitator of Fra 
Filippo Lippi. 

Formerly in the collection of Mr. F. Mason Perkins in Assisi. 



No. 126 
SANO DI PIETRO f^Qt, V 

Born in Siena in 1406; died there in 1481. Pupil of Sassetta. 
The Academy of Siena owns forty-six of his paintings. Other works 
by him in the Vatican, the Louvre, in the Dresden Gallery and elsewhere. 
He painted also miniatures. 

VIRGIN AND CHILD 

(Tempera on panel, with pointed Gothic top. Original frame, 
with delicate crockets above on the outside of the arch) 

Full length. On a simple stone seat the Virgin sits en- 
throned, holding with both hands the infant Christ, who stands 
upright on her lap. The Virgin's head is bent toward the 
right and her whole figure turned slightly in that direction. 
Her eyes, like those of the Child, are turned toward the spec- 
tator, whom the young Christ blesses with His right hand. In 
His left He holds a scroll inscribed, "EGO S[UM]." The 
Virgin is almost completely enveloped in a dark blue mantle 
held together on her breast by a jeweled clasp. The mantle 
covers her feet, but allows the edge of a white veil to show 
about her face and reveals a portion of her red dress with its 
embroidered border. The Child is partly clothed in a reddish- 
white drapery. On either side against the gold background is 
a seraph's head with halo and outstretched parti-colored wings 
extending up and down. Both the Madonna and Child have 
halos incised in the gold background, the former inscribed 
"Maria Dei Gratia et Mise " 

Height, 57 mches; width, 27 inches. 
Formerly in the collection of Mr. F. Mason Perkins in Assisi. 



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No. 127 
MATTEO DI GIOVANNI 

Born in Siena about 14,'5"); died in Siena, 1495. Pupil of 
Domenico di Bartolo. Influenced by Sano di Pietro. The most im- 
portant Sienese painter of the second half of the fifteenth century. 
Worked only in Siena. 

VIRGIN AND CHILD, WITH SS. BERNARDINO 
AND CATHERINE OF SIENA 

(Tempera on panel, round-topped. Original frame, gilded) 

The half-length figure of the Virgin is turned slightly to the 
right so that she may the more easily hold the Christ Child, 
whom she supports with both hands. The Child is clad in a 
transparent tunic of fine white material with a narrow line of 
embroidery at the neck. The Virgin wears a blue mantle over 
a red gown, both bordered with gold. On her right shoulder 
is the customary golden star. Behind the Virgin on the left is 
St. Bernardino (or St. Antoninus, according to Hartlaub) 
dressed in a gray Franciscan robe and holding an inscribed 
tablet and a reed-like cross. On the right is St. Catherine, 
her head covered with a white wimple. She holds a book and 
a lily. The background and halos are of gold tooled in pat- 
terns. The halo of the Virgin is inscribed REGINA CELI 
LETAUE ALLE. . . . Around the semicircular head of the 
panel is the inscription AVE . MARIA . STELLA . DEI 
MAT. . . . 

Height, 29 inches; width, 20y 2 inches. 

Painted about 1470-80. Compare G. F. Hartlaub, "Matteo da 
Siena," Strassburg, 1910, p. 7(), plate VIII — where the picture is 
reproduced as in the collection of Mr. F. Mason Perkins, from whom it 
was purchased through Mr. Bernard Berenson. 



No. 128 
NEROGGIO DI BARTOLOMMEO LANDI 

Bom in Siena in 1447; died there in 1500. Influenced by Vecchi- 
etta and Francesco di Giorgio. Worked in Siena. Sculptor and painter. 

MADONNA AND CHILD °lM, 

(Tempera on panel. In the original frame) 



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Half-length figure of the Virgin, who holds the Child on 
her right arm and bends her head toward His. She wears a 
gold and orange-colored dress with a dark blue mantle which 
covers her head. In the halo around her head the inscription, 
AVE MARIA GRATI(A). The Child, with smiling face 
and blond curling hair looks up to her and holds a toy in 
his right hand. He wears a gold shirt ornamented with em- 
broidery. Gold background. 

Height, 18 1 /) inches; width, 12l/o inches. 
Early work under the influence of Vecchietta. 



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No. 120 

0*0 
JAGOPO ROBUSTI, called TINTORETTO 

Horn at Venice in 1518; died there in 1594. Pupil of Titian. 
Influenced by Michelangelo. Worked in Venice. Next to Titian and 
Veronese the most important painter in Venice in the latter part of 
the sixteenth century. Painter of portraits, religious and allegorical 
subjects. 

SCENE FROM THE LEGEND OF THE TRUE 
CROSS 

(Canvas) 

At the right of the picture St. Helen, clad in a golden brown 
imperial mantle over a rose-colored dress and wearing a high 
crown, stands with right hand upraised directing the work of 
excavation. In the foreground a little to the left, a turbaned 
laborer clad in a red robe over pink is lifting from the 
ground a cross which he holds in both arms. In the middle 
distance between the saint and the laborer stand three men in 
flowing robes and turbans of blue and brown. At the extreme 
left of the picture two workmen hold the two other crosses 
which have just been dug up. In the far distance suggestion 
of a river and a landscape. Golden brown, rose and yellow- 
green predominate in the color. 

Height, 8I/4. inches; width, 19 inches. 

A sketch by Tintoretto for a predella panel. He treated the same 
subject as an altar-piece in St. Maria Mater Domini in Venice. (Re- 
produced in Thode, "Tintoretto," p. 6'.) 

Purchased from Mr. R. Lang ton Douglas, London. 



No. 130 

JAGOPO ROBUSTI, called TINTORETTO 

SCENE FROM THE LEGEND OF THE TRUE 

CROSS Q/ 

(Canvas. A companion sketch to the preceding panel) 

In the right center St. Helen, again clad in a rose-colored 
dress, imperial mantle, and golden crown, directs two turbaned 
laborers at her right, who are carrying the dead body of a 
man toward the true cross, the shaft of which is seen at the ex- 
treme left of the panel, supported by a man wearing a short 
yellowish tunic over a rose-colored under-coat. At the left of 
the saint another laborer, clad in a whitish robe, with his back 
turned toward the spectator, holds a second cross, while in the 
background at the right of Helen the third is seen in the arms 
of a workman. Behind this group at the extreme right are 
two spectators. In the background at the left a clustered 
column with suggestions of a gloomy landscape beyond. 

Height, 8I4 inches; width, 19 inches. 

Purchased from Mr. R. Langton Douglas, London. 



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No. 131 
Attributed to BERNARDO STROZZI 

Born in Genoa, 1581 ; died at Venice in Kil-l. Pupil of Pietro 
Torri at Genoa. Worked mostly at Genoa, later in Venice. Painter 
of genre scenes and religious compositions, of portraits and still life. 
Also an engraver. 

PORTRAIT OF A CAVALIER IX ARMOR (said 
to be Admiral Tinzini) 

(Canvas. Rich frame of the period) 

Three-quarter length. He wears armor of a greenish-brown 
color and a red belt. Green-brown curtains behind him. Rooks 
and mariner's instruments on a table to the left. 

Height, -K) inches; width, S'3 1 /-^ inches. 

It is difficult to give a convincing attribution to this broadly and 
expressively painted work, which is undoubtedly of the Genoese school 
of the early seventeenth century. Until a better name is found, that 
of Strozzi, the best artist in the city during the period, may be accepted, 
as has been suggested by Dr. Bode. 

Purchased from Professor Grussi, Florence. 



DUTCH PAINTINGS 



No. 132 



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ANTONIO MORO, called SIR ANTHONY MOORE 

Born at Utrecht about 1512. In 1547 member of the St. Lucas 
Guild in Antwerp. Died between 1576 and 1578. Pupil of Jan Scoorel. 
Worked in Holland, England, France and Spain. Court painter to the 
King of Spain. Painter of portraits and religious scenes. 

PORTRAIT OF A MAN 

(Panel. Frame of the period) 

Three-quarter length, turned to the right, with dark eyes 
looking at the spectator. Dark mustache and beard; black 
costume and bonnet; small ruff and cuffs. He holds a pair 
of gloves in one hand and rests the other on a skull. Dark 
neutral background. 

Height, 321/2 inches; width, 25 V^ inches. 

About 1560-70. The portrait seems to represent a Spanish noble- 
man, and was very likely painted by Moro during his stay in Madrid. 

Purchased from the Ehrich Galleries. 



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No. 133 

ANTONIO MORO, called SIR ANTHONY MOORE 
PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN 

(Panel. Companion picture to the preceding) 

Thbee-quarteb length, slightly turned to the left and looking 
out of the picture at the spectator. Pale, oval face with 
prominent nose and dark eyes and hair. She wears a small 
semi-ruff and tight-fitting mulberry-colored velvet bodice with 
short puffed sleeves trimmed with fur. Her skirt is of the 
same red velvet, opening down the front to show an underskirt 
in white and gold brocade. Her long, tight-fitting undersleeves 
are of white satin embroidered in gold, similar material showing 
also at the neck. She wears a fur tippet with jeweled ends, 
and a chain, brooch, girdle, bracelets and rings of gold thickly 
set with jewels. She holds the elaborate pendant ornament of 
the girdle in her left hand. On her head a jeweled coif. 

Height, 33 inches; width, 25^ inches. 

Purchased from the Ehrich Galleries. 



SPANISH PAINTINGS 



No. 134 \J 



l) 



ALONSO SANCHEZ GOELLO 



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Born at Benifayro, near Valencia, Spain, in 1515 ( ?) ; died at 
Madrid in 1590. Pupil of Antonio Moro. School of Madrid. Portrait 
painter. 

PORTRAIT OF A NOBLEWOMAN ( called the 
"GIRL IN RED") 

(Canvas. Italian frame of the period elaborately decorated in 

gilded gesso, surmounted by a pediment with a painted 

medallion of God the Father and on either side 

the Virgin Annunciate and the Angel Gabriel) 

Full-length figure. She is standing near a table upon which 
she rests her right hand, in which she holds a fan. In the other 
is a lace handkerchief. She wears a white lace ruff and stiff 
red dress decorated with gold bands. Diagonally across her 
breast is the chain of an order. Behind her a dark green 
curtain. 

Height, 79 V2 inches; width, 45% inches. 

Exhibited in the Copley Hall Exhibition, Boston, 1912. Cata- 
logue No. 13. Paintings by Coello in the same style in the Madrid 
and Vienna Galleries. 

Purchased through Stanford White in Paris. 






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No. 135 QC 

MAZO (JUAN BAUTISTA del MAZO MARTINEZ) 

Born at Madrid about 1610; died there in 1687. Educated in the 
school of Velasquez, whose daughter he afterward married, and whom 
he succeeded as court painter to Philip IV. Mazo's works are frequently 
confused with those of Velasquez. Painter of portraits and landscapes. 

THE INFANTA MARGARITA {Daughter of King 
Philip IV and Mariana of Austria) 

(Canvas. Elaborately carved frame of the period) 

Three-quarter length, slightly turned to the left. She is 
about seven years old and wears a tight-waisted, full-skirted 
costume of greenish silk with pink ribbons. The hair is 
parted on the right and falls loose to the shoulders. It is 
fastened with a pink ribbon on her left temple. The right 
hand rests on a table; the left holds a fan which is only partly 
seen. 

Height, 281/2 inches; width, 23!/2 inches. 

Velasquez painted the same princess three times : first at about 
the age of three, a picture now in Vienna; second at the age of four, 
now in the Louvre; and third at about the age of seven, also in Vienna. 
Ours does not correspond exactly with any of these. The position is 
somewhat similar to the one in the Louvre, while the face resembles that 
of the later Vienna portrait. This is very likely one of the portraits 
intended as a gift from the Spanish King to some other European 
Court, and was probably painted in Velasquez's studio. The late A. de 
Berruete was the first rightly to attribute the work to Mazo. As the 
princess was born in 1651, the painting was executed about 1658. 

Purchased from the Lesser Galleries, London, through Mr. Bernard 
Berenson. 



TAPESTRIES 



136— TAPESTRY WITH GOLD AND SILVER 
THREAD 



FLEMISH: BRUSSELS (about 1510). 
(In gold frame) 



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Noli me Tangere : The composition represents the risen 
Christ and Saint Mary Magdalen in the garden. Christ 
is standing to the right draped in a red cloak and hold- 
ing a spade in his left hand, his right raised as though 
he was uttering the words "Touch me not." The Mag- 
dalen kneels on the left, her hands folded as if in prayer. 
She wears a rich costume with a headdress of white 
linen and an enveloping mantle of red and silver bro- 
cade of Italian design. The sleeves and underdress are 
of dark blue velvet. The box of ointment stands between 
the two figures. The background shows the garden with 
an orange tree in the center and a wattled fence in the 
distance. Beyond hills and rocks covered with fruit 
trees, the towers of Jerusalem can be seen on the horizon. 
The foreground is filled with flowers of many varieties, 
while the border shows flowers, birds and leaves in a 
beautiful and free design against a dark blue background. 
Gold and silver in costumes and in landscape. 

Height, 7 feet 9 inches ; width, 6 feet 7 inches. 

The tapestry shows the highest development of the art of 
Flemish weaving. It was made at the end of the Gothic period 
when the designer came under Italian influence, as is evident from 
the harmonious simplicity of composition as well as from the 
details, the costume of Saint Mary Magdalen being of Italian 
brocade and the trees and foliage peculiarly Southern in char- 
acter. A Spanish product is seen in the box of ointment, a 
covered albarello of Hispano-Moresque faience. 

Formerly in the Spitzer Collection. 



137— TAPESTRY 



/ affod 



BURGUNDIAN: TOURNAI (atelier of JEAN GRENIER, 

ABOUT 1505). 

Cavaliers and Woodcutters: In the middle a white 
horse with saddle and bridle. By the head of the horse 
stands a page clad in blue and red, holding a sword. 
Behind are two men, one in red with a spear, and the 
other in a bine garment and red hat, with a hunting 
horn which he is blowing. To the left a bag-piper in a 
red slashed costume; to the right a peasant in tan and 
blue, cutting down a tree. Hilly country with towers 
in the background. In the foreground flowers and 
stumps of trees. A hound by the horse's feet. An 
orange or lemon tree full of fruit and blossoms behind 
the horse. 

Height, 9 feet 9 inches; width, 11 feet 9 inches. 

This tapestry, in all probability, is the left half of one in 
the Musee des Arts Decoratifs in Paris, which represents the lord 
of the manor inspecting - the work of his woodcutters. The master 
stands in the left-hand corner of the tapestry talking with one of 
his workmen, and it seems likely that our tapestry continued 
the design to the left. The riderless horse would then belong to 
the master, whose page is waiting behind him with his mount. 
The style of the two pieces is precisely the same. A. Warburg 
(Zcitschrift fur bildende Kunst, 1907) has shown that the 
tapestry in Paris, and therefore ours, very likely belonged to 
the set which was ordered by Philip the Fair directly from Jean 
Grenier, one of the most famous weavers in Burgundy. 




138— TAPESTRY 

FLEMISH: BRUSSELS (about 1510) 

Probably from a cartoon by Maitre Philip after a design by 
Jan van Room. 

Mythological subject: In the center underneath a 
brocaded canopy supported on four slender posts sits a 
king — Jonathan, according to the legend in Gothic let- 
ters above his head. He is clad in tan-colored brocade 
ornamented with ermine and holds a sceptre in his right 
hand. His left is raised as he addresses two women and 
two men who stand at the right of the throne. One of 
the women, who is dressed in blue and carries a palm, 
looks at the king as though offended by his remarks. 
On the left of the throne stands Lucrece, according to 
the inscription near her. The train of her gorgeous 
furred dress, of blue pomegranate-pattern brocade, is 
held by a young female attendant. Behind her are four 
women, holding palms. In the upper corners of the tap- 
estries are balconies filled with men and boys in elab- 
orate hats. Some of the boys stand on the railing em- 
bracing the columns. The foreground is filled with 
flowers. General color a soft light golden brown, re- 
lieved by pale reds and blues. The border shows grapes 
and roses against a red background. 

Height, 9 feet 6 inches; width, 10 feet 4 inches. 

From the great similarities in style, this tapestry was 
probably designed by the same artist who conceived the cele- 
brated Herkenbold Tapestry in the Brussels Museum, which 
according to documentary proof was the work of Jan van Room. 



BURGUNDIAN (about 1460) 



139— TAPESTRY 



Frederick Barbarossa: A knight in bine and gold 
armor, wearing a jeweled turban and the imperial crown 
and carrying in his right hand an unsheathed sword, is 
mounted on a white charger which advances toward the 
left. The knight has the collar of an order round his 
neck, and wears on his left arm a small tilting shield 
inscribed with the double-eagle. The horse is protected 
by a brocaded surcoat in tan color, with an elaborate 
border, and the device F. B. on a shield twice repeated. 
The bluish foreground is thickly strewn with flowering 
plants, while in the middle distance of the background 
are orange trees with two large birds in their branches. 
In the far distance are castles with red roofs and ban- 
ners flying from their turrets inscribed "F" and "B." 
In the upper right-hand corner an heraldic shield. At 
the top above the knight is a scroll inscribed in Gothic 
letters : 

"Vaillant, hardi, noble, chevallereux 
Par ma proesse je conquis plusieurs lieux 
Tant de citez je fondis en mon temps 
Que les ro[is jajmais eu furet tozoiteus." 

Height, 10 feet 5 inches; width, 11 feet, 11 inches. 



140— TAPESTRY 

BURGUNDIAN (about 1470) *V 

The Triumph of the Innocents: Five great spotted 
giraffes, in pale tan, four of them with long jeweled 
and belled collars, fill the foreground of the tapestry. 
On the back and tied around the shoulders of each is 
fastened a heavy drapery in red or blue, forming a palan- 
quin in which are seated two or three young children, 
the "Innocents." Three bearded drivers for the giraffes, 
with elaborate turbans and heavy staves, can be distin- 
guished among the press of attendants who fill the tap- 
estry. In the lower left-hand corner a turbaned woman 
offers a vessel full of milk to the two children mounted 
on the giraffe nearest her. She is attended by a piper on 
her left and by an Ethiopian drummer on her right. 
Underneath one of the giraffes in the center of the fore- 
ground is the head of a chained and captive dragon. In 
the right-hand corner another Ethiopian with small 
drums. In the middle distance at the left an elephant 
bearing a woman holding two of the Innocents, in the 
center a pomegranate tree bearing both fruit and flowers, 
and at the right a river with ships and a towered city 
beyond. In the remote distance at the upper edge of the 
tapestry, hills, trees and castles. Narrow modern edging 
composed of three stripes. Predominant colors, tan, blue 
and red. 

Height, 9 feet 8 inches; length, 12 feet. 



RUGS 



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141— LARGE RUG OF THE SO-CALLED 

ISPAHAN TYPE 

EASTERN PERSIA: HERAT (first half of XVIIth Cen- 
tury) 

Field: On a light claret ground, design of large pal- 
mettes and leaf forms chiefly in yellow-green, accented by 
light blue, and cloud bands in white and green and in 
white and yellow outlined in green. The slender con- 
necting stalks are in white and light blue. 
Borders: Peony flowers and palmettes chiefly in yellow 
and light blue on dark blue ground. 
Inner Guard Band: Conventional leaf design in yellow 
and dark blue on white ground. 

Outer Guard Band: Small floral design in white-yellow 
and blue on red ground. 

Size: 19 feet 6 inches by 7 feet 10 inches. 







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142— LARGE RUG OF THE SO-CALLED 

ISPAHAN TYPE 

EASTERN PERSIA: HERAT (beginning of XVIIth Cen- 
tury) 

Field: On a bright claret ground, formal design of pal- 
mettes and leaf forms chiefly in orange, accented by dark 
blue, and of cloud bands in dark blue and green and in 
white and yellow outlined in light blue. The slender con- 
necting stalks are in white and light blue. 
Border: Large floral motifs chiefly in orange and blue 
on dark blue-green. 

Inner Guard Baud: Geometrical design in blue on 
orange. 

Outer Guard Band: Floral design in dark and light blue 
on orange. 

Size: 18 feet by 8 feet 3 inches. 



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143— RUG OF THE SO-CALLED ISPAHAN TYPE 



EASTERN PERSIA: HERAT (first hat/f of XVIIth Cen- 
tury) 

Field: On a soft claret ground, design of large palmettes 

and leaf forms chiefly dark blue and orange, accented by 

dark blue, and of cloud bands in yellow and blue. The 

slender connecting stalks are in white. 

Border: Peony flowers and palmettes chiefly in yellow 

and red on dark green. 

Inner Guard Band: Geometrical design in red and yellow 

on green. 

Outer Guard Band: Floral border in blue and white on 

yellow. 

Size : 6 feet 8 inches by 4 feet 5 inches. 







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144— RUG OF THE SO-CALLED ISPAHAN TYPE 

EASTERN PERSIA: HERAT (first half of XVIIth Cen- 
tury) 

Field : On a pale claret ground, design of large palmettes 

and leaf forms chiefly in dark blue accented by orange 

and white, and of cloud bands in rose color and blue and 

in dark blue and orange. The slender connecting stalks 

are in white and light blue. 

Border: Peony flowers chiefly in rose and orange and 

in green and brown on dark blue. 

Inner Guard Band: Undulating design of dark leaves 

on light yellow ground. 

Outer Guard Band: Floral design on red ground. 

Size: 13 feet 9 inches by 5 feet 10 inches. 



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145— RUG OF THE SO-CALLED ISPAHAN TYPE 

EASTERN PERSIA: HERAT (first half of XVIIth Cen- 
tury) 

Field: On a bright claret ground, design of large pal- 

mettes and leaf forms chiefly in yellow-green, accented by 

orange, and in dark blue and orange, and of cloud hands 

in similar colors. The slender connecting stalks are in 

white and light blue. 

Border: Peony flowers and pomegranates chiefly in 

green, orange and red on dark blue-green. 

Inner Guard Band: Geometrical beading on light blue. 

Outer Guard Band: Small floral pattern in dark blue, 

green and red on orange ground. 

Size: 7 feet 7 inches by 4 feet 11 inches. 



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146— RUG OF THE SO-CALLED ISPAHAN TYPE 

EASTERN PERSIA: HERAT (first half of XVIIth Cen- 
tury) 

Field: On a rosy claret ground, design of large palmettes 

and leaf forms chiefly in yellow-green, yellow and white, 

and of cloud bands in dark blue and yellow and in light 

blue and white. The slender connecting stalks are in 

white and dark blue. 

Border: Peony flowers, chiefly in yellow and red on 

dark blue-green. 

Inner Guard Hand: Floral pattern in pinkish-orange on 

green. 

Outer Guard Band: Floral pattern in dark and light 

blue on rose. 

Size: 6 feet 10 inches by 4< feet 7 inches. 



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147— HUG OF THE SO-CALLED ISPAHAN TYPE 

EASTERN PERSIA: HERAT (first half of XVIIth Cen- 
tury) 

Field'. On a dull claret ground, design of large palmettes 

and leaf forms chiefly in yellow-green, accented by dark 

blue, and of cloud bands in yellow and green. The 

slender connecting stalks are in white and light blue. 

Border: Peony flowers and palmettes chiefly in yellow 

and red on dark blue. 

Inner Guard Band: Small floral pattern in red and blue 

on green ground. 

Outer Guard Band: Floral pattern in light and dark 

blue on red ground. 

Size: 6 feet ii inches by 4 feet 7 inches. 



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148— RUG WITH CONVENTIONALIZED FLOWER 
DESIGN 

INDIA: IMPERIAL MANUFACTORY (about 1650) 

Field: On a strong claret ground, yellow trellis frame- 
work enclosing balanced groups of yellowish-white 
flowers with details in bine and pink. In the center a 
large conventionalized flower with four petals. 
Border: Design of single large flowers alternating with 
groups of four small flowers and Buddhist symbols on a 
claret ground. White guard bands with running flower 
pattern. 

Wool. Said to have come from a Mandarin in the northern 
part of China. 

Size: 15 feet H 'nidus by 12 feet 2 inches. 



TEXTILES AND EMBROIDERIES 



149— STOLE 

ARMENIAN (XVII-XVIIIth Century) 



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Saints in niches, gold embroidery on red. Tassels at the 
ends. 

Length, 8 feet 2 inches; width, 5 /V<7. 



150— COVER IN GREEN VELVET AND EMBROIL 
ERY 

ITALIAN (second half of XVIth Century) 

Background of old red velvet with strips and edging of 
galloon. Down the center a piece of embroidery in gold 
and color on a red background. In the center two cir- 
cular medallions containing figures of a male and a 
female saint. 

Length, 8 feet 4 incites by 1 foot 8 inches. 



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151— ECCLESIASTICAL MITRE 

RUSSIAN (XVIIIth Century) 

Of the domed shape used in the Greek Church, embroid- 
ered all over in silver and color in a floral design. 

Height, 9 inches. 






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RUSSIAN (XVIIIth Centuky) 

Of the domed shape used in the Greek Church, embroid- 
ered in silver on a crimson velvet ground with a 
design showing saints in niches. On the upper part con- 
ventionalized patterns; around the bottom an inscription. 
The top surmounted by an ornament in gilded metal. 



Height, 8 inches. 




1.53— COPE HOOD 



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ITALIAN (XVth Centuky) 

The Last Judgment: At the top an arcade of three 
Gothic arches under which at either side is a trumpeting 
angel, and in the center Christ sitting in judgment with 
the Virgin kneeling in adoration on His right and Saint 
John on His left. In the foreground the Archangel 
summoning the dead, who rise on all sides. Embroid- 
ered in colored silk and gold on a linen ground. Edged 
with galloon and a dee}) gold fringe. 



154— ECCLESIASTICAL BANNER 

SPANISH (late XVIth Century) 



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Straight top, and sides cut into two long triangular 
points below. Red velvet, embroidered in gold and color. 
In the upper part an elaborate cartouche showing two 
cherubim holding a chalice with the sacred wafer. Tas- 
sels on the points and at the ends of the supporting rod. 

Size : 7~ inches by 36 inches. 



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155— ECCLESIASTICAL BANNER 

SPANISH (latkXVIth Centuey) 

Straight top and sides cut into two long triangular 
points below. Red velvet embroidered in gold and color. 
In the upper part an elaborate cartouche showing St. 
Michael. Tassels on the points and at the ends of the 
supporting rod. 

Silk velvet. 

Size: 79 inches by 33 indies. 



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156— ECCLESIASTICAL BANNER 

SPANISH (XVIIIth Century) 



Straight t<yp and sides cut into two long triangular 
points below. Red velvet, much worn, embroidered in 
gold. In the upper part a cartouche worked with the 
coat-of-arms of a cardinal. Tassels on the points and at 
the ends of the supporting rod. 

Size: 80 inches by 40 inches. 



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157— ECCLESIASTICAL BANNER 

SPANISH (about 1700) 

Straight top and sides cut into two long triangular 
points below. Blue-green velvet, embroidered in silver. 
In the upper part a small cartouche set in an elaborate 
border, and surmounted by a crown worked on red 
velvet, and supported by two flying cherubim. Two 
smaller cartouches on the points showing ecclesiastical 
devices. Tassels on the points and at the ends of the 
supporting rod. 

Size: 92 inches by 43 inches. 




158— ECCLESIASTICAL BANNER 

SPANISH (about 1700) 

Straight top and sides cut into two long triangular 
points below. Green velvet, embroidered in silver. In 
the upper part a cartouche of blue velvet worked with 
the coat-of-arms of a cardinal. Tassels on the points and 
at the ends of the supporting rod. 

Size: 81 inches by 41 inches. 






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159— ALTAR FRONTAL 

ITALIAN ( middle of XVIth Century) 

Dark red velvet embroidered in gold and colors. Four 
panels divided by columns. Each panel consists of an 
oval surrounded by strap-work. First oval, the Virgin 
holding the Christ Child; second oval, martyrdom of St. 
Sebastian; third oval, the Virgin enthroned surrounded 
by saints and angels; fourth oval, St. Roch with an 
angel. Border of a running floral design. 

Length, 5 feet 3 inches; width, 2 feet. 



1G0—VELVET COPE 

ITALIAN (XVIth Century) 



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Plain red velvet, with orphreys and hood embroidered 
in gold and colors. The orphreys are divided into eight 
panels containing Renaissance ornament, each sur- 
rounded by a band of galloon. In the center of each panel 
a circular medallion containing the half-length figure of 
an apostle. The hood shows a mitred bishop sitting en- 
throned against a gold background. The hood is edged 
with galloon and gold fringe. The bottom of the cope 
is bound with galloon. 

Length, 9 feet 6 inches; depth, 4 feet 6 inches. 



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161— VELVET COPE 

ITALIAN (XVth Century) 

Green velvet, brocaded in a fine pattern derived from 
the form of the pomegranate. The orphreys, embroid- 
ered in gold and colors, are divided into six rectangular 
panels, each of which originally contained the figure of a 
saint standing in a simple early Renaissance niche with 
a round arched top. 

Length, 9 "feet 8 inches; breadth, 4 feet 5 inches. 



162— VELVET BROCADE D 

ITALIAN: VENICE (XVth Centuiiy) 

One section of a great climbing pattern, based on the 
pomegranate and the pink. Alternating concave and con- 
vex bands covered at their intersections by a large pome- 
granate device above and two similar devices, reduced in 
size, below. Pattern in red velvet on a gold brocade 
ground. Edged with galloon. 

Size: 38 inches by 23 inches. 





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163— TABLE COVER 

ITALIAN (XVIItii Century) 

Crimson velvet embroidered all over with a foliated pat- 
tern in gold, showing conventionalized lilies, roses and 
other flowers. Edged with galloon and deep gold fringe. 

Length, 72 inches; width, 48 inches. 

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164— EMBROIDERY 

ITALIAN (XVIIth Century) S}jO 

Similar to preceding. 

Size: Length, (jj) inches; width, Ji5 inches. 



165— COVER IN VELVET BROCADE 
ITALIAN: VENETIAN (XVth Centuey) 



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Three strips of a great climbing pattern based on the 
pomegranate, in red velvet against a gold background. 
The whole edged with galloon. 

Size: Length, 1) feet 8 inches; width, 5 feet 5 inches. 



166— HANGING 

(Composed oe XVIIth Centuey Italian materials) 

A strip of red velvet ornamented with an applied car- 
touche, between two strips of large figured green damask. 
Separated by galloon. 

Length, 8 feet 5 inches; breadth, 6 feet 10 inches. 




164 



167— TWO VELVET HANGINGS 

ITALIAN: GENOESE (XVII-XVIIIth Century) 

In the center of each a large armorial cartouche sur- 
rounded by a deep border of baroque ornament. Yellow 
and blue, on red ground. 

Height, 7 feet 6 inches; width, 7 feet. 

168— FIVE HANGINGS ? 2*7 ^ 

Composed each of three strips of crimson velvet separated 
by broad bands of galloon. 

Length, 13 feet by 5 feet 6 inches. 



169— DEEP CRIMSON VELVET HANGINGS 
ITALIAN (XVIth Century) 



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The entire hangings of a room, 50 strips, each measuring 
10 feet 2 inches long by 19 inches wide; 4 strips 5 feet 
6 inches long by 19 inches wide. 

Total: 176 lineal yards 2 feet 4 inches. 



170— THREE PAIRS OF CURTAINS WITH LAM- 
BREQUINS 

(Made oe XVIth Century Italian materials) 

Of the same crimson velvet as the wall hangings No. 169. 
Trimmed with galloon, and with cartouches and armorial 
bearings in applique on each lambrequin. 

Size of lambrequin: Height, 2 feet; length, 5 feet 6 inches. 
Size of one curtain 10 feet, 7 inches by -1 feet 11 inches. 



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171— PAIR OF PORTIERES WITH LAMBREQUIN 



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(Made of XVIth Century Italian materials) / 

Crimson velvet to match the wall hangings, No. 1G9. 
Each portiere is ornamented with a long embroidered 
strip down the center composed of two orphreys placed 
end to end, probably taken from a cope. The orphreys 
are ornamented with arabesques in applique and em- 
broidery on a red ground, surrounding circular medallions 
containing half-length figures of saints in fine embroid- 
ery. The lambrequin is trimmed with portions of 
orphreys showing saints in full length alternating with 
medallions and arabesques similar to those on the cur- 
tains. In the middle a large cope hood of a slightly later 
period has been applied. 

Size of lambrequin : Height, 2 feet 2 inches; length, 9 feet 
5 inches. 

Size of one curtain: Height, 11 feet 4 inches; xvidth, 6 

feet 3 inches. 
Cope hood: Height, 29 inches; width, 22 inches. 



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172— PAIR OF PORTIERES WITH LAMBREQUIN 

(Made of XVIth Century Italian materials) 

Crimson Genoese velvet, ornamented with galloon. In 
the center of each curtain and the lambrequin a cartouche 
or coat-of-arms in applique. 

Size of lambrequin : 7 feet by 2 feet. 

Size of one curtain : 9 fee t 2 inches by 6 feet 4 inches. 



173— THREE PAIRS OF PORTIERES 

ITALIAN (XVIth Ckntuby) 

Made of old Genoese velvet, deep crimson in color, 
trimmed with bands of broad galloon and embroidered 
cartouches. 

Size of one portiere: 9 feet 2 indies by 4 feet 10 inches. 



174— THREE PAIRS OF CURTAINS WITH LAM- 
BREQUINS 

(Made of XVIIth Century Venetian damask) 

Green, woven in self color with a design of two cherubim, 
one on either side of a monstrance with the sacred wafer. 
Trimmed with modern galloon. 

Size of lambrequin: 5 feet by 1 foot 6 inches. 

Size of one curtain: 9 feet 8 inches by 5 feet 5 inches. 



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175— PAIR OF PORTIERES 

Green damask, to match the preceding. In three strips, 
separated by galloon. 

Height of one portiere: 8 feet 9 inches; width, 8 feet. 



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176— THREE PAIRS OF CURTAINS WITH LAM- 
BREQUINS 

(Made of XVIIth Century Venetian materials) 

Crimson damask, with a large foliated design. The 
same damask is used on the furniture for this room. 
The lambrequins trimmed with galloon and gold fringe. 

Size of each curtain: Height, 11 feet 8 inches; 

width, 3 feet 9 inches. 
Size of lambrequin: Height, 2 feet; width, 5 feet. 



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177— TWO PAIRS OF PORTIERES, WITH LAM- 
BREQUINS 

ITALIAN (XVIth Century) 

Red velvet ornamented with a bold and effective pattern 
in gold galloon. At the bottom deep gold fringe. 



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Size of lambrequin: Height, 2 feet 1 inch; length, 9 feet 

6 inches. 
Size of single portiere: Height, 11 feet 4 inches; width, 

4 feet 8 inches. 




178— HANGING 

(Made of XVIIth Century Venetian Damask) 

Three strips of crimson damask woven in a bold floral 
pattern. Trimmed with galloon. 

Size: 7 feet 5 inches by 8 feet. 



AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION, 

Managers. 

THOMAS E. KIRBY, 

Auctioneer. 



THE RITA LYDIG COLLECTION 



Notable Art Treasures 

OF THE 

GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE 
PERIODS 



TO BE SOLD UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF 

THE AMERICAN ART ASSOCIATION 

MADISON SQUARE SOUTH 
NEW YORK 



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